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Los Angeles: Departments


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Management
Materials Science and Engineering
Mathematics
Medical Microbiology and Immunology
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Medicine
Meteorology
Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics
Military Science
Molecular and Medical Pharmacology
Molecular Biology
Molecular Toxicology
Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology
Molecular, Cellular, and Integrative Physics
Music
Musicology

Management
There is no history currently available for this department.

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Materials Science and Engineering
There is no history currently available for this department.

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Mathematics
In 1919, when the Los Angeles State Normal School became the Southern Branch of the University, George E. F. Sherwood was charged with the responsibility of organizing a Department of Mathematics to provide courses equivalent to those given in the first two years in the Departments of Mathematics, Civil Engineering; and Astronomy on the Berkeley campus. An upper division course offering was provided in 1923, and by the time the campus had graduated its first student in 1925, the faculty of the mathematics department had grown to 13 in number, with Earle R. Hedrick as chairman. Astronomy had developed into a full four-year program but the pre-engineering curriculum remained essentially a two-year program until the College of Engineering was formed at Los Angeles in 1944-45.

The move to Westwood saw little change in the size of the department, and a separate Department of Astronomy was created in 1931-32. Hedrick offered the first graduate course in mathematics in 1933. He became provost in 1937, and William M. Whyburn was appointed chairman.

The graduate program expanded rapidly during the next decade and the first Ph.D. was awarded in 1947. By then, a staff of 16 faculty members was ready to offer supervision of doctoral dissertations in many fields. The establishment of the Institute of Numerical Analysis on this campus by the National Bureau of Standards attracted many distinguished visitors during the next few years and the Department of Mathematics assumed direct responsibility for numerical analysis research in 1954. An independent computing facility was established in 1961 to meet the demands of other scholarly fields in the application of mathematics.

The graduate student enrollment, nearly 300 part- and full-time students during the academic year 1964-65, continued to expand. The needs of these students and the general scientific emphasis of a space age found the department continuously evaluating its curriculum. Thus, 1965-66 saw the department embarked on a program in applied mathematics with the cooperation of other interested departments and institutes.

By the mid-1960s, the mathematics department awarded approximately 20 doctoral degrees each year. The tenure faculty numbered 32, and there were approximately 50 assistant professors, lecturers, and distinguished visitors.

Paul H. Daus, Magnus R. Hestenes, Edwin F. Beckenbach, Angus E. Taylor, and Paul G. Hoel have also served as chairman. Lowell J. Paige headed the department in the mid-1960s. Each, in turn, witnessed a steady growth in faculty, student load, and research production. In addition to the government contracts awarded faculty members (totalling over $2 million during the period 1958-64), the mathematics faculty received numerous Fulbright awards and Guggenheim fellowships, one Sloan fellowship, and a distinguished teaching award from the University. source

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Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
There is no history currently available for this department.

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Medical Microbiology and Immunology
The Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, one of the first five departments in the School of Medicine at Los Angeles, was organized as the Department of Infectious Diseases in October, 1947 with Dr. Charles M. Carpenter as chairman. During the formative years of the school, the department's function was to assist in planning curricula and in developing the building program. The first faculty numbered two full-time members and increased to 13 full-time, 12 clinical and in-residence, and two emeritus professors by the mid-1960s. Upon the retirement of Dr. Carpenter in July, 1962, Dr. A. F. Rasmussen, Jr., became the department's second chairman. In February, 1963, the department was renamed medical microbiology and immunology to more appropriately connote the changing emphasis in its teaching and research.

In October, 1950, a graduate program for the M.S. degree in infectious diseases was approved, and in April of 1952, a Ph.D. program was approved. The first graduate students were accepted in 1951. In June, 1952, the first M.S. degrees were awarded, and in June, 1955, the department's first two doctoral students received their Ph.D. degrees. Since that time the registered graduate students in the department increased to 30, primarily doctoral students. In addition, a postdoctoral training program was developed, with five postdoctoral students in the mid-1960s.

In the fall of 1952, instruction was undertaken for second-year medical students, initially for 30 and increasing to 128 students in 1966. In September, 1965, instruction in the principles of microbiology and immunology began for 24 second-year dental students.

The aim in the medical curriculum was to present systemically the basic principles of the host-parasite relationships in infectious diseases, with emphasis on the related fields of immunology, immunogenetics, and immunochemistry, with clinical correlation. In the 1960s more emphasis was placed on the fundamental aspects of microbiology and immunology.

The departmental graduate program was originally designed for students with primary interests in host-parasite relationships. Students pursued advanced study and research in the broad field of microbiology and immunology or in any one of the specialized fields: bacteriology, immunochemistry, immunogenetics, microbial genetics, mycology, parasitology, or virology.

Research projects in diverse areas of microbiology and immunology were supported by U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) grants, government contracts, tuberculosis and health associations, American Cancer Society, California Institute for Cancer Research, and various private donors. Graduate and postgraduate training was supported by a USPHS training grant in microbiology and immunology. The department also participated in an interdisciplinary mental health training program and collaborated with the School of Public Health in a training program in tropical infectious diseases. source

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Medicine
The Department of Medicine was established in July, 1948, at which time Dr. John S. Lawrence was appointed chairman. Dr. Norman B. Nelson, who was assistant dean and associate professor of medicine, constituted the only other full-time member of the department. Drs. William S. Adams and William N. Valentine were the next additions in 1950. By the mid-1960s, the department grew to a size of 96 full-time appointees (including in-residence and research staff), 131 house staff (including those at affiliated institutions), 288 clinical staff, and 180 non-academic staff.

The general aims of the Department of Medicine were the following: 1) appointment of individuals who would be both able and willing to render excellent care to patients; 2) development of active and worthwhile research programs; 3) recognition of the fact that while teaching of medical students is the raison d'être for medical schools, excellent care of the patient is fundamental to good instruction and all other functions once the patient is admitted; 4) cultivation of close association with the various departments of the academic and graduate schools.

The first offices of the department were in the Atomic Energy Project building. Later, a temporary building was constructed for this purpose and still later, the Religious Conference Building was used. The first laboratories were also located in the Atomic Energy Project building. Soon after this, space was made available on the West Medical campus for a hematology laboratory and at the Veterans Administration Center (Sawtelle) for a gradually increasing variety of laboratories.

The first class of medical students was admitted in 1951. Intensive instruction in medicine began in the latter part of the 1951-52 session, when courses entitled Introduction to Clinical Medicine and Clinical Microscopy were begun. Regular medical instruction in the usual courses in the area of medicine was given at Sawtelle Veterans Administration Hospital and Harbor County General Hospital during 1953-54 and the first half of 1955. The University Hospital opened in July, 1955.

From the beginning, most teaching was from the bedside rather than by didactic lectures. By the mid-1960s, the curriculum underwent substantial change with emphasis on a greater breadth of elective courses, particularly during the senior year. source

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Meteorology
See Atmospheric Sciences.

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Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics
There is no history currently available for this department.

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Military Science
On May 20, 1920, President David P. Barrows addressed a letter to the Adjutant General of the Army, requesting the establishment of an infantry unit of the Reserve Officer's Training Corps (ROTC) at the Southern Branch of the University. On July 1, 1920, the application was approved by the Secretary of War.

The department was organized that year and 516 students were enrolled in the program, with the advanced course being added in 1923. Initially, the only course offered was in infantry. In 1934, a coast artillery course was added to the curriculum and continued until 1943. By 1940, there were 1,526 students in the military program out of 4,428 males enrolled at the Los Angeles campus.

From 1940 to 1943, the program of the department remained unchanged except for the inroads made by the war into the enrollment figures. Under the reorganization of the Los Angeles campus in 1946, the department was placed in the College of Applied Arts. In 1947, the department undertook a program of training students for the Air Corps. By the spring of 1950, the total ROTC enrollment was 1,543 out of a total of 9,857 male students. In the fall of 1950, the Air Force ROTC became a separate department.

With the advent of the Korean War, the enrollment at the Los Angeles campus began to drop off, although not at the rate experienced during World War II. In the spring of 1951, ROTC enrollment dropped to a total of 896 in the infantry and quartermaster courses.

The branch general course introduced in 1954 has continued as the basis of instruction to the mid-1960s with slight modification. This course reduced the amount of purely military instruction and added academic elective courses of three units in the fields of effective communications, science comprehension, general psychology, political development, and political institutions.

In July, 1960, with the closing of the College of Applied Arts, the department was placed in the College of Letters and Science. In September, 1962, enrollment in the basic course was made voluntary by action of the Regents. Total enrollment dropped at this time from 1,004 to 207; yet despite the drop, the commissioning of second lieutenants from the advanced course has remained above 40 per year.

In October, 1964, the ROTC Vitalization Act provided a retainer pay of $40 per month for advanced course cadets and also provided for two- and four-year scholarships and a two-year program in addition to the traditional four-year program of instruction.

By the mid-1960s, the Military Science Department had commissioned over 2,000 second lieutenants. Over ten per cent of the commissioned cadets chose the Army as a career and accepted Regular Army commissions. source

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Molecular and Medical Pharmacology
There is no history currently available for this department.

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Molecular Biology
There is no history currently available for this department.

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Molecular Toxicology
There is no history currently available for this department.

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Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology
There is no history currently available for this department.

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Molecular, Cellular, and Integrative Physics
There is no history currently available for this department.

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Music
The Department of Music came into existence with the establishment of the Southern Branch of the University in 1919; the curriculum in music of the Los Angeles State Normal School was continued under the auspices of the newly formed branch of the University, leading to the bachelor of education degree, with preparation for elementary and secondary special teaching credentials in music. As part of the Teachers College, the department continued to emphasize music education until the late 1930s, when musicologists and composers were added to the faculty of the department In 1939, an undergraduate major in music, granted through either the College of Applied Arts or the College of Letters and Science, was established.

By the mid-1960s, the undergraduate program provided a general humanistic education with music as the focal point and was offered through both the College of Fine Arts (established in 1960, replacing the College of Applied Arts) and the College of Letters and Science.

The curriculum leading to a master of arts degree in music was instituted in 1940; the first graduate degrees in music were conferred in June of 1941. The program leading to the degree of doctor of philosophy was approved in 1946; the first Ph.D. degree in music was granted in 1949.

The Institute of Ethnomusicology was formed in 1960 to foster research and the dissemination of information about the art music of the non-West and the tribal, folk, and popular music of the world.

The music building, completed in 1955, was renamed Schoenberg Hall in 1963 in honor of the composer Arnold Schoenberg, who was a member of the department from 1936 until 1944. In addition to classrooms, rehearsal halls, office space, and a central auditorium, Schoenberg Hall housed the Music Library, which was expanded to a holding in excess of 50,000 books and scores and approximately 20,000 recordings. A series of books and monographs entitled "University of California Publications in Music" was initiated in 1943.

Performance activities date from the noontime organ recitals begun in 1931 and later included concerts by orchestral, operatic, band, choral, and chamber ensembles as well as by 17 ethnic performing organizations. The faculty complement grew from five members in the early 1920s to a mid-1960s staff of 52, 23 of whom held professorial appointments. The remainder were full- or part-time lecturers. The number of students majoring in music in the mid-1960s was approximately 500, including 100 at the graduate level. In addition, almost 3,500 students from other departments received instruction annually in music and its literature. source

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Musicology
There is no history currently available for this department.

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