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History
Home Economics
Horticulture and Agronomy
Human and Community Development
Human Physiology
Hydrology

History
From modest beginnings in 1951 as part of combined History and Political Science in the new College of Letters and Science, the Department of History, independent by 1960, over the next four decades fulfilled the vision of the California Master Plan and became a strong voice of the liberal arts. Two history courses had first been offered in 1936 as part of general education for students in the College of Agriculture. The new department of 1960 numbered eight faculty, guided by two Berkeley doctorates who arrived to teach service courses after World War II. Undergraduate enrollments in history courses, in pace with the dramatic expansion of the college, numbered 359 in 1952 and 2,282 in 1965. This golden era of American higher education likewise saw the number of faculty historians more than quadruple by 1970 as scholars and teachers of variety, distinction, and exceptional congeniality were recruited not only from nearby Berkeley and Stanford but also from Chicago, Columbia, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, and Princeton. All were devoted to effective classroom teaching, and nine of them over three decades garnered campus teaching awards.

By the 1980s curricular offerings had been widened and deepened to encompass all of the traditional chronological, geographical, and topical historical themes together with new courses in women's, ethnic, and world history. In keeping with new perspectives, between 1971 and 2000 the department added 19 women to its professorial ranks in all fields and installed professors in African-American and Mexican-American (or borderlands) history, and privately endowed chairs in the history of the American West and the history of the Holocaust.

Davis historians earned professional recognition over the decades, publishing through major university presses and the outstanding historical journals. Two of them won the Pulitzer Prize in History (1965 and 1996), while others were honored by leading historical organizations (in which some held offices), by other universities, and by overseas awards in Taiwan and Siena, Italy. Together with campus physicists using protein milliprobing, one faculty member became an expert in determining the authenticity of early books, including Gutenberg bibles. Several faculty authored nationally used textbooks and anthologies. The journal Agricultural History found a suitable home and an excellent editor in the department from 1965 to 1984. Historians strengthened university governance by serving long hours in key committees and offices of the Davis and statewide Academic Senate; one also served a term as faculty representative to the Board of Regents. The collegiality of the department was underscored over the years by the guidance of six able chairs.

The department established its doctoral program in 1962. Intensive, critical seminars and close mentoring, including introductions to quantitative and comparative methods of historical inquiry, became the hallmarks of this training, which resulted in the publication of many dissertations, among them several prize winners. UC Davis doctoral graduates in history, most of whom had served as teaching assistants in the department, went on to academic positions across the nation and abroad. source

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Home Economics
Instruction in home economics began on the Davis campus in the fall of 1936. A non-degree two-year program was taught by a faculty of five under the chairmanship of Professor Agnes Fay Morgan (Berkeley), with Mrs. Louise C. Struve Crowder as the local director. In 1942 the department was authorized to offer a complete undergraduate program and the bachelor of science degree was conferred upon the first two graduates in 1946.

In 1953, the department became an independent unit, with Professor Gladys Everson as its first chairman. Also in 1953, the present home economics building was completed, the culmination of joint efforts of the department staff and the California Farm Bureau Federation. After that date, there was major growth in number of staff and students and undergraduate majors in child development, dietetics, foods, nutrition, design, and textile science were added. Graduate study in nutrition, foods, and consumer economics were available after 1957, followed by child development and textile science.

Both students and faculty of the department received recognition for outstanding achievements. Of 436 majors who had bachelor's degrees from 1953 to 1965, 91 were elected to Omicron Nu, 16 to Phi Beta Kappa, and 31 to Phi Kappa Phi. Accomplishments of the faculty were recognized by the granting of Guggenheim Foundation and MacDowell Colony fellowships; by election to national office in professional societies; and by consultative or committee assignments for the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, U. S. Department of Agriculture, and U. S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare. Three members of the faculty were recipients of the Borden Award for fundamental research in nutrition. In addition, the research and creative activities of the faculty received financial support from the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

By the mid-1960s the teaching and research programs of the department increasingly emphasized the basic biological, physical, and social sciences--training students for careers relating to the problems and interests of consumers as individuals and families and seeking new knowledge in nutrition, food properties, child development, consumer economics, housing, and textile science. A further step in the evolution of these programs took place in 1965 with the decision to reorganize the administrative structure of the department, anticipating the long range objective of establishing a professional school of consumer and family sciences. In the reorganization, the name of the curriculum was changed to Family and Consumer Sciences; the faculty of home economics was assigned to various discipline-oriented departments; and the teaching program was directed and coordinated by an associate dean. source

The Department of Home Economics was disbanded in a 1965-66 reorganization, with faculty going to Consumer Sciences (which later became part of the Division of Textiles and Clothing), to Nutrition, and to Applied Behavioral Sciences (now Human and Community Development); see also Division of Textiles and Clothing, Nutrition, and Human and Community Development.

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Horticulture and Agronomy
See Environmental Horticulture and Agronomy and Range Science.

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Human and Community Development
The Department of Human and Community Development is an outgrowth of the Department of Applied Behavioral Sciences, which was created in the mid-1960s. This department developed out of the Division of Education that was started in the early 1920s to train teachers in agriculture, followed by a teacher education program in home economics established in 1950. In 1959 the unit was split in two. Teacher preparation in agriculture and home economics moved to the new Department of Agricultural Education while the Department of Education in the College of Letters and Sciences was given responsibility for preparing teachers for grades 1-12.

In the 1964-66 period, when the College of Agriculture was undergoing extensive reorganization, the Department of Home Economics was dissolved. Departmental faculty in the sciences went to their respective discipline departments while those in the social sciences were assigned to the Department of Agricultural Education. This unit then became the home department for child development, design, agricultural and home economics education, and the beginnings of community development.

In 1969 the Department of Agricultural Education was renamed the Department of Applied Behavioral Sciences (ABS). In 1970 the Native American and Asian American Studies programs were added to the new department. During the period of student unrest in higher education, the ABS department became known for responding to student requests for more relevant curricula and better university management. The department grew rapidly to 29 faculty and more than 500 majors in its first five years. Within ten years the faculty numbered over 40, and there were 700 undergraduate majors.

In 1983 design faculty members left ABS to form the Department of Environmental Design, and in 1989, Native American Studies and Asian American Studies moved to the College of Letters and Science. About this time the program in agricultural education was transferred to the Department of Agronomy. In 1996 the former Department of Applied Behavioral Sciences became the Department of Human and Community Development, with eight faculty members in each of the remaining two programs in human development and community and regional development. Human development currently has about 500 undergraduate majors, plus 53 students in the master's and 25 in the doctoral programs. Community and regional development has about 100 undergraduate and 73 master's degree students.

The human development major explores "the developmental process in humans throughout the life cycle" with special emphasis on cognitive and personal social development. The community and regional development major addresses social, political, and economic issues in a changing state and society, and their global connections. Research topics are approached by applying social science theory and methods to the study of community processes and problems. source

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Human Physiology
There is no history currently available for this department. See School of Medicine.

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Hydrology
See Land, Air, and Water Resources--Hydrology.

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