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Management
Mathematics
Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering
Medicine
Medieval Studies
Microbiology
Military Science
Molecular and Cellular Biology
Molecular Biosciences
Music

Management
See Colleges and Schools, Graduate School of Management.

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Mathematics
Instruction in mathematics at Davis dates from the early days of the University Farm School. The first courses were of a service nature and directed toward practical application in agriculture. In addition, the staff gave instruction in surveying through the Division of Irrigation Investigations and Practice. Instruction in physics, first offered in 1927, was also assigned to the mathematics staff. In 1933 Edward B. Roessler was sent to Davis from Berkeley to develop the Division of Mathematics and Physics and to create statistical services for agriculture. This combined division grew until 1953, when two separate departments were created.

During the 1960s the Department of Mathematics dramatically increased in size, from 12 faculty members (with only two full professors) in 1958 to 33 by 1970. At the end of the 1960s, Robert W. Stringall, with some input from Sherman K. Stein, started the federally funded SEED program, which involved the innovative teaching of advanced mathematics (e.g., calculus) to elementary school students, especially minorities. The Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) program was launched in the early 1970s to produce mathematics teachers with strong pedagogical backgrounds.

By 1978 there were 41 faculty members whose expertise, activities, and interests were no longer bound by the single word "mathematics." The department split into those who remained in the Department of Mathematics and those who went into other units, including the Division of Statistics (formed in 1979), the Division of Engineering Computer Science (formed in 1983), Zoology, Environmental Sciences, and Agronomy and Range Science. Although the separation of the mathematical biologists was a setback from which the department is still recovering, momentum grew in different fields such as mathematical physics and topology. In the 1980s the department formed a strong research group in applied mathematics. At the same time, several campus research scientists joined applied mathematicians to initiate a graduate group and an organized research unit. The Graduate Group in Applied Mathematics (GGAM), formed in 1984, offers an interdisciplinary master's and doctoral degree program.

Economic woes in the 1990s brought strict budget controls, a hiring freeze, and academic salary reductions, which hit the mathematics department hard. The department lost a large number of faculty. As it struggled for survival, the department set higher standards for promotion, tenure, and recruitment. As a consequence, it evolved into a respected research center in many modern areas of mathematics by the end of the 1990s. Several faculty from prestigious national and international universities joined the department and contributed to the spread of its international reputation, including William P. Thurston, winner of the Fields Medal, the most prestigious award in mathematics. Research grants and contracts continue to increase.

During the 1990s department faculty received several prestigious awards. Joel Hass, Abigail Thompson, Jeremy Quastel, and Greg Kuperberg received Sloan Foundation fellowships. J. Blake Temple was awarded a Guggenheim fellowship, and Roger J. B. Wets won the George B. Dantzig Prize of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. Angela Cheer and Abigail Thompson also earned NSF Career Advancement Awards. source

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Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering
There is no history currently available for this department. See College of Engineering.

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Medicine
See Colleges and Schools, School of Medicine.

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Medieval Studies
There is no history currently available for this department.

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Microbiology
In 1922 Courtland S. Mudge became the first bacteriologist to be appointed in the Department of Dairy Industry (later called Dairy Science, then Food Science and Technology). For some years he alone offered all the instruction in microbiology at Davis: one course in general bacteriology taken by generations of students. After World War II, Mudge was joined by Mortimer P. Starr, whose interest was plant disease bacteria, and Donald M. Reynolds, who assisted Selman Waksman in the discovery of streptomycin. This faculty of three constituted the Section of Bacteriology in the Department of Dairy Science.

Graduate instruction in microbiology began in the 1940s. The Graduate Group in Microbiology included faculty from various units at Davis and also from the Berkeley and San Francisco campuses. Food scientists Emil Mrak and Herman Phaff at Davis and H.A. Barker, Roger Stanier, and Michael Doudoroff of Berkeley were influential in guiding the development of Davis graduate students.

In 1952, after the College of Letters and Science was established, bacteriology became a department in the new college. Allen G. Mary joined the faculty in 1952 and together with Mudge, Starr, and Reynolds developed the courses and curriculum that constituted the undergraduate major in bacteriology. Graduate instruction, however, remained the province of the Graduate Group.

With Mudge's retirement, Robert E. Hungate, distinguished by his pioneering studies on cultivation of strict anaerobes and rumen microbiology, joined the Department of Bacteriology as its chair in 1956. His presence materially strengthened the department's growing reputation as a leader in microbial physiology and diversity. Recognizing the increasing importance of the emerging field of microbial genetics, the department recruited Monica M. Riley, a student of Arthur Pardee, in 1960. In 1962 Hungate stepped down as chair, to be replaced by John L. Ingraham, who transferred into the department from the Department of Viticulture and Enology.

With the growth of enrollments at Davis, faculty recruitment proceeded rapidly. Donald Kessler, a microbial geneticist, joined the department in 1967; Mark Wheelis, microbial physiologist, in 1970; David Pratt, a virologist, in 1970; Sydney Kustu, microbial physiologist, in 1973; Paul Baumann, general microbiologist, in 1973; JaRue S. Manning, virologist, in 1974; Stanley W. Artz, microbial physiologist, in 1976; and John C. Meeks, a microbial physiologist, in 1977. More recent additions include Martin Privalsky, transcriptional regulation, in 1984; Douglas Nelson, microbial ecology, in 1985; Daniel Klionsky, yeast cell biology, in 1990; Michele Igo, microbial genetics, in 1990; Stephen Kowalczykowski, microbial molecular genetics, in 1991; Merna Villarejo, microbial physiology, in 1993; Mitchell Singer, microbial genetics, in 1995; Wolf-Dietrich Heyer, DNA repair and recombination, in 1998; Kazuhiro Shiozaki, signal transduction in yeast, in 1998; and Valley Stewart, microbial genetics, in 1998.

The term "bacteriology," the department's name and the one used almost universally by similar departments, began to sound too restrictive and old-fashioned by the 1970s and 80s, and a wave of name changes ensued. In 1988 the unit became the Department of Microbiology. With the reorganization of the Division of Biological Sciences, the department became the Section of Microbiology in 1992. source

See also Division of Biological Sciences.

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Military Science
The Department of Military Science and Tactics, University of California, Berkeley, began teaching ROTC at Davis in January 1923 under the direction of Colonel J. T. Nance. One officer came to Davis once a week and instructed 70 students. Students progressing to the advanced course transferred to UC Berkeley. The University paid the travel expense of one officer and provided a clerk for support. Active duty military personnel were assigned to the Davis campus in 1925.

In December 1942 the ROTC department was closed, and the Western Signal Corps School used campus facilities until the fall of 1945. UC Berkeley then detailed First Lieutenant David T. Butts Jr. to command the Davis unit. Enrollment during this first quarter numbered 45 students.

In December 1948 Colonel William L. Ritter, professor of military science training, Berkeley, and UC President Robert G. Sproul proposed the establishment of a permanent unit at Davis. The proposal was approved and implemented effective August 1, 1949. The unit was designated as the Area Service Unit 6849, Reserve Officers' Training Corps at University of California, College of Agriculture, Davis, California. The unit was designated as Infantry Branch ROTC. The first commander of this unit was Lieutenant Colonel William E. Ball, Infantry. The unit was redesignated as a General Military Science program starting in fall 1953.

In 1985 UC Davis was nominated as an Ordnance Corps Affiliation Unit in July, and in December became an Ordnance Corps Affiliation University. The following year, the UC Davis ROTC Battalion adopted the name "Forged Gold Battalion" and the motto "Hi-Speed," which is intended to reflect the corps' dedication to excellence in leadership and professionalism in training.

UC Davis cadets have distinguished themselves on numerous occasions. In 1956 and again in 1958 they won the coveted Warrior of the Pacific trophy, the only stateside unit to win the award twice. In 1988 UC Davis was named the best-trained school in the nation at Advanced Camp 88. In 1997 UC Davis was recognized as the Top Medium School, a Department of Army Award, in the nation. In 1990 three Forged Gold Battalion cadets were selected for the Army fellowship program, allowing them to pursue advanced degrees in their chosen academic fields of study.

An average of 150 cadets are enrolled annually in military science, and the department commissions about 20 cadets a year. Currently, California State University, Sacramento, is a cross-enrolled program of UC Davis. source

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Molecular and Cellular Biology
Established in 1993, the Section of Molecular and Cellular Biology within the Division of Biological Sciences originated in part out of the Department of Biochemistry, created on the Davis campus in 1958. Mark G. McNamee, a biochemistry and biophysics faculty member since 1975, was chair of that department when in 1993 the Division of Biological Sciences, originally established in 1970, underwent a major reorganization. When Division faculty members chose their new affiliations, 35 faculty members from the Departments of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Genetics, and Zoology formed the nascent Section of Molecular and Cellular Biology. McNamee was named interim dean of the Division of Biological Sciences in 1993, and Carl Schmid became the first chair of the new section. Michael Dahmus succeeded Schmid in 1998.

The Section of Molecular and Cellular Biology has a distinguished reputation. Members of the section and its forerunner have received numerous recognitions of their accomplishments from national and international organizations as well as the Davis campus. Paul Stumpf, Eric Conn, and Melvin Green were elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1978, 1980, and 1988, respectively. Paul Stumpf is also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science as are four other members of the section (James Clegg, John Crowe, Roy Doi, and Richard Nuccitelli).

In 1998 the section collaborated with the Department of Chemistry to spearhead a campus initiative in structural biology, an area of research that promises to be a key part of biological studies in the 21st century. A core group of three structural biologists was recruited for this initiative, further strengthening the campus's molecular biology programs. Recognizing the potential of the proposed structural biology program at UC Davis, the Keck Foundation in 1999 awarded the campus a large grant to establish the W. M. Keck Center for Structural Biology. The center includes a protein expression facility and X-ray crystallography suites.

In addition to fostering excellent research programs, the Section of Molecular and Cellular Biology is committed to providing undergraduates with an exceptional education. Through both the College of Letters and Science and the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, the section currently administers three undergraduate majors, which enroll more than 1,000 students: (1) biochemistry, (2) cell biology, and (3) genetics. Also, most of the section's faculty members offer undergraduates an opportunity to participate in their research.

Campus awards to Eric Conn and R. Scott Hawley manifest the section's commitment to undergraduate education. In 1989 Conn received the UC Davis Prize for Teaching and Scholarly Achievement, an award conferred by the UC Davis Foundation. Hawley, professor of genetics, in 1997 received the Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Mentoring Undergraduate Research. source

See also Department of Biochemistry and Division of Biological Sciences.

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Molecular Biosciences
There is no history currently available for this department. See College of Veterinary Medicine.

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Music
The Department of Music was formally established on July 1, 1958. The founding member of the department was composer Jerome Rosen, appointed in 1952 to the Department of Philosophy and Fine Arts in the new College of Letters and Science. He was joined by music historian Richard Irwin in 1953, composer Richard Swift in 1956, and composer/theorist George Perle, later winner of the Pulitzer Prize, in 1957. "Five O'Clock Concerts," forerunner of the Thursday Noon Concerts, began in October 1954 with chamber music played by Irwin, violin; Rosen, clarinet; Herman Phaff, professor of Food Science and Technology, cello; Forrest Honnold, music teacher at Davis High School, flute; and Ida Mae Harter, beloved local piano teacher. A chamber orchestra assembled from time to time became in due course the UCD Symphony Orchestra, formally established under Richard Swift and offering its inaugural concert on February 26, 1959. On Rosen's recommendation the Davis campus commissioned the celebrated French composer Darius Milhaud to compose a musical work for the opening of Freeborn Hall in February 1962.

Under the leadership of Richard Swift, chair 1963-71, the faculty grew to seven, established an M.A. program in 1964, presented the first Faculty Research Concert, and launched the Artist-in-Residence program in 1966-67. The first artist-in-residence (complementing a visit of the German composer Karlheinz Stockhausen) was the avant-garde pianist David Tudor, beginning a distinguished succession that has included Paul Badura-Skoda, piano; Bethany Beardslee, soprano; Gerard Souzay, baritone; Martin Neary, organ; Davitt Moroney, harpsichord; and the Hilliard Ensemble. Swift and others, including the percussionist Stanley Lunetta, formed an improvisatory New Music Ensemble that drew international attention, as did a journal, Source, edited by Larry Austin and Arthur Woodbury.

The department moved from its original quarters in temporary buildings to the eighth floor of the new Sproul Hall to await completion of the Music-Art-Drama complex in the fall of 1966. Swift oversaw the start of studio instruction in applied music in 1969-70. Musicologist Theodore Karp secured funding for a collection of historical musical instruments that led to the mutation of the madrigal singers group into the Early Music Ensemble in 1973. In 1969-70 Albert J. McNeil, director of the Los Angeles Jubilee Singers, began his 20-year tenure as UCD's immensely popular director of choruses.

Subsequent chairs of the department were Theodore Karp, 1971-72; Swift, 1972-73 (acting); Rosen, 1973-77; Sydney Robinson Charles, 1977-79; D. Kern Holoman,1979-88; David Nutter, 1988-92; Christopher Reynolds, 1992-96; and A. Wayne Slawson,1996-present. Ph.D. study in composition and musicology was offered in 1989, with the first Ph.D. awarded in 1994. Composer Ross Bauer, appointed in 1988, established a new professional musical group, now called the Empyrean Ensemble, that has helped assure UCD's prestige in composition and contemporary music. Editorial offices of the journals 19th Century Music and Beethoven Forum were established at UC Davis in 1978 and 1991, respectively.

Music faculty have won dozens of major awards and prizes, among them a UC Davis Prize; a Faculty Research Lectureship; two Distinguished Teaching Awards; four Guggenheim fellowships; two American Council of Learned Societies fellowships; a Humboldt fellowship; some half dozen NEH and NEA awards; 12 national and international composition prizes; two national publication awards; and a knighthood. The Department of Music currently comprises 10 faculty members, 23 lecturers and instructors, 11 staff, 16 graduate students, 60 undergraduates, and an annual student enrollment of about 3,000. Its mission remains much as its founders imagined it: advanced research and creative work in the fields of composition and music theory, music history and criticism, and music performance, and a firm commitment to excellence in teaching. source

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