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Pathology
Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology
Pediatrics
Pharmacology
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Physics
Physiological Sciences
Plant Biology
Plant Pathology
Political Science
Pomology
Population Health and Reproduction
Poultry Husbandry
Psychiatry
Psychology
Public Health

Pathology
There is no history currently available for this deparment. See School of Medicine.

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Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology
Following a restructuring of the School of Veterinary Medicine in the early 1970's, anatomic and clinical pathology were both incorporated into this department.

Pathology
Pathology was always a functional part of the Division of Veterinary Science although its limited number of researchers were necessarily disease-oriented rather than discipline-oriented. Many of the research reports of the pioneer investigations contained excellent descriptions of the pathology of diseases under investigation. With the establishment of the School of Veterinary Medicine in 1948, pathology was developed as a separate discipline, first as an informal group under the direction of Drs. Donald E. Jasper (1948-50) and Donald R. Cordy (1950-60). With departmentalization of the school in 1960, the Department of Pathology gained official status under the chairmanship of Dr. Cordy. It had six academic staff members in 1965 and the development of some degree of specialization had been possible by that point.

Pathology is a most important subject in the training of a veterinarian, bridging the transition from basic to clinical sciences. At Davis, the major instruction was given during the second year of the curriculum and was followed by practical experience in autopsy pathology during the final year of instruction. Specialized advanced courses were given for a large number of graduate students from this and other departments. A National Institutes of Health research training grant to the department greatly facilitated graduate training.

Research in the department extended over a wide range of problems in infectious, metabolic, and nutritional disease and in poisoning and neoplasia. Members of the staff frequently cooperated with members of other departments on research projects. source

Clinical Pathology
When it first became clear that the University would have a School of Veterinary Medicine, Dr. Clarence M. Haring, then chairman of the Division of Veterinary Science, was convinced that this school would be a leader in developing the discipline of clinical pathology for veterinary medicine. Dr. Haring saw to it that space for such a department was provided and that courses of instruction were included in the early curricular plans. Dr. Oscar W. Schalm accepted Dr. Haring's request to lead in the development of this discipline. The Department of Clinical Pathology was officially established on July 1, 1960 under Dr. Schalm's chairmanship. By 1965, it had four academic staff members.

The members of the group in clinical pathology contributed materially in the fields of bovine mastitis (for which one member received the Borden Award), veterinary hematology, and veterinary clinical biochemistry. Staff members wrote two textbooks: Veterinary Hematology (the only textbook on this subject in the English language, by 1968 in its second edition and in a Spanish translation) and Clinical Biochemistry of Domestic Animals. In 1961, the department received a National Institutes of Health training grant in clinical pathology in support of graduate training for the Ph.D. degree.

Veterinary students received courses in hematology and in clinical biochemistry from the department. It also offered personalized instruction to seniors in the use and interpretation of laboratory methods for diagnosis of disease.

Research areas of interest in the 1960s included bovine mastitis, hepatic disease, urolithiasis, and diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs. All of these projects received extramural support. source

See also School of Veterinary Medicine.

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Pediatrics
There is no history currently available for this deparment. See School of Medicine.

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Pharmacology
There is no history currently available for this deparment. See School of Medicine.

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Philosophy
In 1952 Arthur Child came to Davis to take charge of the newly formed Department of Philosophy and Fine Arts. He began instruction in philosophy with 31 undergraduate students. The unit developed with the addition of William Bossart in 1957 to become a separate Department of Philosophy in 1958, with a major program in 1959. Neal Gilbert and Ronald Arbini joined the department in the early 1960s. Due to the dedicated efforts of Child and Gilbert, an outstanding collection of philosophy books and journals has been developed in both the Shields and departmental libraries.

In 1965 Marjorie Grene and John Malcolm joined the department. Graduate students were also first accepted that year. The main emphasis in both undergraduate and graduate teaching was on the history of philosophy, a concentration that was useful in placing a good number of graduate students in junior colleges. All members of the department were qualified to teach advanced courses in either ancient or modern (17th-18th century) philosophy. This focus was maintained through the late 1970s as Fred Berger, Joel Friedman, G. J. Mattey, and Michael Wedin joined the faculty. Virtually all members of the department, however, had other interests too: Marjorie Grene, for example, was internationally known in an impressive number of fields, notably continental (European) philosophy and philosophy of biology, in addition to her work on historical figures such as Aristotle and Descartes.

In more recent years the predominant focus of the department no longer has been on the major figures of the past. A History and Philosophy of Science program was started in 1983 under the supervision of James Griesmer. Until 1990 it was primarily a lecture series, but in that year it became an interdepartmental program with an undergraduate minor. Though originally concentrated on philosophy of biology, it came to include philosophy of physics (Paul Teller). Several people have replaced Fred Berger in ethics and philosophy of law (currently Jerry Dworkin and Connie Rosati), and at present the majority of graduate students are working in that field.

The prevailing direction of the department can be characterized as analytic rather than continental. Central areas of philosophy are strongly represented with metaphysics (Michael Jubien), philosophy of language (Jeff King), and philosophy of mind (Robert Cummins). Recently Richard Wohlheim held a joint appointment (with Berkeley) and taught aesthetics. The ten faculty members who comprise the department currently teach 700 students annually. Seventy-one of those students are majors, and 22 are graduate students.

Many of the people who helped found the department retired in the 1990s. The department continues, however, to maintain a respected academic reputation, and in the fall of 1999 the Philosophical Gourmet Poll ranked the department in a tie for 20th place in the nation. source

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Physical Education
See Exercise Science.

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Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
There is no history currently available for this deparment. See School of Medicine.

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Physics
In 1953 the former Department of Mathematics and Physics split into two separate departments. Gordon Patten, chair, and two other faculty members, Milton Gardner and John Jungerman, comprised the Department of Physics. Majors in physics were graduated in 1957, and the first M.A. degree was awarded in 1958. After 1959 the department expanded rapidly, with faculty added in both theoretical and experimental nuclear physics. The Ph.D. in physics was approved in 1961, with the first Ph.D. awarded in 1965.

Early research emphasized nuclear physics in order to concentrate the few departmental resources. Earnest Lawrence, director of the Berkeley Radiation Laboratory (now the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), offered helpful assistance in obtaining funding from the Atomic Energy Commission (now the Department of Energy) to build a precision beta ray spectrometer as the department's first research instrument. John Jungerman became the principal investigator for this effort. Lawrence also supported later Davis efforts to construct a 22-inch cyclotron and the present 76-inch cyclotron. With the construction of the 76-inch cyclotron, Crocker Nuclear Laboratory (CNL) became an Organized Research Unit in 1965 and was separated from the physics department, with Jungerman serving as director. The earlier 22-inch cyclotron was transferred to the physics department of the University of Chile with funds from the Ford Foundation.

William Knox became chair of the department in 1963. Under his leadership the research interests of the faculty broadened into experimental condensed matter physics and additional areas of theoretical physics. In 1967 Richard Lander joined the faculty to establish research in high-energy physics. This group continues to do research at accelerators worldwide. Another active group assists it in theoretical-high-energy physics, led by Jack Gunion, who joined the faculty in 1975. At CNL, faculty member Thomas Cahill led research on analysis of air quality using particle-induced X-rays. His research group now has the responsibility for analyzing air pollutants in all national parks and has become world famous for its work. The department's nuclear physics experimental group continues an active program with National Science Foundation support, working particularly in relativistic heavy ion physics. Well recognized under the leadership of Paul Brady, the group has recently added new faculty to replace retirees.

Since 1987 several faculty members have focused on condensed matter. Robert Shelton, a condensed matter experimentalist, and Barry Klein, a condensed matter theorist, were recruited as chairs of the department, and, under their leadership, 12 condensed matter faculty members have been added in diverse areas such as surface physics and laser physics. Both Shelton and Klein have since moved into higher administrative positions.

Not until the advent of the Keck Telescope was the Davis campus able to fully develop an astronomy/cosmology program. Robert Becker, who joined the department in 1985, was the only faculty member in this area for more than ten years. Andrea Albrecht joined the faculty in 1997. Winston Ko, present chair, is now recruiting faculty in Early Universe Cosmology, a field that is being stimulated by many new measurements on earth and in outer space, as well as by developments in high-energy physics.

The department currently has over 30 faculty members and about 100 graduate students active in research in leading areas of physics. About 50 undergraduate students are majoring in physics while about 7,000 students receive physics instruction annually. source

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Physiological Sciences
This department in the School of Veterinary Medicine was initially established as an unofficial Department of Pharmacology in 1950. A course in physiological chemistry was added in 1951 and one in physiology in 1953. The department became official in 1960 under the chairmanship of Dr. Stuart A. Peoples, who guided its development from its inception until 1965, when Dr. Charles E. Cornelius became chairman.

The department had a rapidly expanding graduate program and staff members accepted students in the fields of nutrition, animal physiology, comparative pathology, and comparative biochemistry. The veterinary courses were open to graduate students and special graduate courses were offered in Intermediary Metabolism, Radioactive Tracers in Biology, Biological Effects of Radiation, and Advanced Mammalian Physiology.

The staff members, who numbered ten in 1965, were engaged in research programs in the fields of intermediary metabolism of dairy cows, neuromuscular physiology, enzymatic changes in nutrition and disease, perinatal physiology, prolonged gestation, the physiology of parturition, neuropharmacology, biophysical studies on sub-cellular particles, and toxicology of arsenicals and chlorinated hydrocarbons. source

Following a restructuring of the School of Veterinary Medicine in the early 1970's, the department no longer exists as such. See also School of Veterinary Medicine.

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Plant Biology
The current Section of Plant Biology is a direct descendant of the former Department of Botany. From its beginnings in 1924 until 1951, W. W. Robbins chaired that department, and well before World War II Davis botanists achieved a reputation for excellence, with the prolific research of plant physiologist Alden S. Crafts and plant anatomist Katherine Esau attracting national attention. Esau's reputation brought Vernon I. Cheadle to Davis for a year's sabbatical in 1951. He became the department's second chair in 1953 and set about improving faculty facilities. A new building was completed in 1960 (Robbins Hall), greatly expanding departmental capabilities. In 1962 Cheadle left the department to become chancellor of the Santa Barbara campus, inviting Esau to relocate there the following year.

Beginning in the early 1950s the department diversified into various aspects of botany: plant anatomy, plant chemistry, plant development, morphology, taxonomy, ecology, and the flowering process. The department became widely known as a pioneer in electron microscopy. T. Elliot Weier and Katherine Esau obtained a grant to purchase the first electron microscope on campus around 1957-58. By the mid-1970s Robbins Hall housed three electron microscopes. The small botanical herbarium that had been kept in six old wooden cases was expanded to much larger quarters in Robbins, eventually growing to a collection housing more than 200,000 specimens, some of worldwide importance.

Noteworthy contributions to the study of botany were made over the years by Davis department members, including E. Epstein, E. M. Gifford, Jr., R. Stocking, J. Tucker, G. Webster, and T .E. Weier, as well as J. McCaskill of the Herbarium. Several from the department strongly supported the development of the campus arboretum. Later faculty members E. Addicott, M. Barbour, D. Boyce, W. Lucas, and K. Wells also built distinguished careers.

In the 1980s the Davis department was considered the largest botany department in the nation. At one point, total faculty affiliations were about 160. The departmental mission included undergraduate and graduate training and research in basic plant biology. Teaching and research efforts concentrated on three basic programs: cell and developmental biology, biophysics of plant functions, and ecology and evolution. In 1983 a national ranking placed the department's undergraduate major program second in the nation and the graduate program first. During this decade the department saw the retirement of several senior professors, jeopardizing its renowned position with respect to undergraduate studies. Meanwhile, the herbarium of the department was named the J. M. Tucker Herbarium, and when Beecher Crampton retired, his extensive collection of grasses was transferred to this collection, increasing its size by 30 percent as well as its usefulness for studies of California plant communities and weed management. The weed science unit of UC Cooperative Extension was also integrated into the department.

During the early 1990s the undergraduate curriculum in botany was revised to create a single program for all students whose interest in plants emphasized biological aspects. The former botany and plant science majors were merged into one: plant biology. The major covers three areas: applied plant biology, plant physiology and development, and plant ecology, evolution, systematics, and diversity. The B.A. degree in botany was terminated, and the department was incorporated into the reorganization of the Division of Biological Sciences. The Section of Plant Biology is now vertically organized to emphasize interactions between disciplines. Faculty members continue to maintain strong ties with plant scientists in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. source

See also Division of Biological Sciences.

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Plant Pathology
Plant pathology was first established on the Berkeley campus as a department of instruction in 1903. A course in plant pathology was first taught at Davis in 1913 by Stanley S. Rogers, a pathologist in the Division of Truck Crops. By 1927, under the leadership of J. B. Kendrick Sr., plant pathology had a permanent presence at Davis, and the Davis faculty, still members of the Berkeley department, were organized into the Davis Division of Plant Pathology. In 1929 L. D. Leach and E. E. Wilson joined the department. Plant Pathology 120 (a degree course) was first taught by J. T. Barrett of the Berkeley staff, later by L. D. Leach. Although Plant Pathology 120 has evolved over the years as the science has matured, it remains one of the longest-running courses on the Davis campus.

Through the 1930s and 1940s, it was possible for students at Davis to take graduate study in plant pathology, but degrees were awarded through Berkeley and students were required to complete one year of study on the Berkeley campus. In 1949 the Davis department was authorized to offer M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in plant pathology independent of Berkeley, and a graduate curriculum was established.

In 1952 the Division of Plant Pathology was granted departmental status, but remained linked to the Berkeley department through a rotating chair/vice chair arrangement. This arrangement persisted until 1963, when the departments became fully autonomous units.

Presently, the department consists of 16 Academic Senate faculty, 5 Cooperative Extension (CE) specialists, one Agricultural Experiment Station (AES) specialist, and one AES plant pathologist. Two members of the department are housed at the Kearney Agricultural Center in Parker, and one at the UC/USDA Vegetable Research Center in Salinas. Additionally, three USDA scientists are housed in the department. Each holds a WOS (without salary) lecturer appointment and is integrated into the department's research, teaching, and outreach programs.

The Department of Plant Pathology contributes fundamental knowledge to the plant and microbial sciences and seeks to integrate that knowledge into studies of plant-pathogen interactions. A key element of the discipline is its ability to integrate knowledge from other disciplines into a holistic approach toward the diagnosis and management of plant diseases.

Since the department's early beginnings on the Davis campus, faculty in plant pathology have earned considerable professional success and recognition, and the department has achieved a position of international distinction. source

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Political Science
Courses in political science were first offered at Davis in the late 1940s. In 1952 the first two full-time political scientists were appointed to the faculty of the Department of History and Political Science within the new College of Letters and Science, with the mission of providing educational breadth for the primarily agricultural students on campus. An undergraduate major was launched in 1954.

In 1960 an independent Department of Political Science was created. Beginning with four members, the department proceeded to implement its original plan to have one faculty member in each of seven political science subfields. Enrollment pressures--political science was to become one of the largest majors on campus--eventually brought the department to more than 25 members. An M.A. program in political science was established in 1961, and a Ph.D. program introduced in 1965.

The department offered a popular undergraduate major in international relations for many years until an interdepartmental program in the field was established in the mid-1970s. Political scientists continue to play a lead role in the program. Departmental faculty were also instrumental in the creation and development of the UC Davis Institute of Governmental Affairs, with one member serving as the longtime director, and of the International Agricultural Center. Political scientists have also been active in University Extension's annual Political Campaign Management Institute, established in 1984.

The department created a second major (Political Science-Public Service) in the early 1970s. Taking advantage of proximity to Sacramento and partly built around the successful internship program, this major has contributed to the significant presence of Davis alumni in the state capital. Department faculty also helped create and develop the UCD Center in Washington, D.C., in 1989.

Several political scientists have been recognized for teaching excellence, with three receiving Distinguished Teaching Awards. A number of department teaching assistants have also won awards for outstanding teaching. Many faculty members have engaged in significant public service activities through appointments to the Governor's staff, assignments with the Agency for International Development, service as congressional and judicial fellows, membership in national party convention delegations, membership in the Davis City Council, service with the U.S. Bureau of the Budget and the U.S. Department of State, and as administrators with the Twentieth Century Fund and the Ford Foundation.

Research activities have been supported by such organizations as the Guggenheim Foundation, the American Council for Learned Societies, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation, the Fulbright Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, the Department of Defense, the U.S. Institute of Peace, the UC Institute for Global Conflict and Cooperation, the Pew Charitable Trust, and the National Science Foundation. A large number of the faculty have received awards for their dissertations from the American Political Science Association, and two department Ph.D. students have received such awards.

Political scientists have been significantly involved in university governance, serving as chairs of Academic Senate committees and of both the Davis and the systemwide Academic Senate. Two former members of the department are now presidents of other institutions of higher education. source

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Pomology
Instruction, research, and public service in horticulture were an integral part of the University of California from the onset. Shortly after the turn of the century, E. J. Wickson, professor of horticulture at Berkeley, and others encouraged orchard plantings and horticultural research at the University Farm at Davis. In 1912-13 the Division of Pomology, encompassing the culture of deciduous fruit, berry and nut crops, appeared as an identifiable entity on the Berkeley campus with concurrent research and instruction at Davis. Increasing pomological activities at the University Farm led to the construction of Horticulture Hall in 1922 and the transfer of divisional headquarters from Berkeley to Davis in 1933, with W. P. Tufts appointed as chairman. In 1959 the department moved to the newly constructed Wickson Hall.

During the 23 years under Tuft's guidance the department evolved significantly, especially after World War II. Faculty trained in disciplines allied to horticulture (e.g., biochemistry, genetics, plant pathology, physiology, soils, and hydrology) were hired. While this trend toward specialization diminished the relative number of more holistic horticulturists, the gap was filled by increasing reliance on Agricultural Extension specialists and pomology farm advisors, who served as vital links between the university and the horticultural industry. The department's activities were enhanced through the endowment of the Wolfskill Experimental Orchard to the department in the 1930s and the establishment of the San Jose and South Coast Field Stations and the Kearney Agricultural Center at Parker in the 1950s and later. Faculty research capabilities have steadily expanded through funding provided by federal and state grants, plant patents, establishment of professorial chairs, and grants from commodity boards, which now comprise nearly 50 percent of departmental research funds.

With the termination of the nondegree program in 1959, undergraduate and graduate teaching continued to evolve along disciplinary lines. Today, with the exception of a few introductory courses and selected advanced studies, virtually all instruction vital to a sound understanding of pomology is offered as an integral part of courses in plant biology and in broader topics such as agricultural systems and environments, hydrology, and science and society. The Department of Pomology's contribution to graduate and undergraduate instruction derives in large part from the vigor of its research, centered in three broad areas: plant improvement (linking classical plant breeding with molecular biology), production systems (fruit tree culture, water-plant-soil relations, plant propagation and ecology), and postharvest biology and technology (physiology and biochemistry of fruit maturation and senescence, preharvest factors influencing fruit quality, storage, and national and international distribution).

Departmental research has brought noteworthy advances in California horticulture. These include dozens of new and successful fruit and nut cultivars, new strawberry cultivars that have revolutionized that industry, findings that have resolved plant nutritional problems in various sectors of the state, early development and subsequent growth of a preeminent program of postharvest research with resultant technological improvements, and other achievements too numerous to describe. source

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Population Health and Reproduction
See Public Health. See also School of Veterinary Medicine.

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Poultry Husbandry
Requests from poultrymen for information on poultry feeding led Myer Jaffa, chemist in the Agricultural Experiment Station, to prepare feed analysis cards which were distributed from 1896 to 1903. From 1904 to 1909 experimental work on nutrition and disease was conducted by the experiment station on a ranch near Petaluma, first directed by a committee of the agricultural faculty at Berkeley, later by Jaffa. The Announcement of Courses, 1907-08-09 listed four courses in poultry husbandry taught by Jaffa and assistants; three of the courses were to be given at the University Farm, Davis. In 1910, the first resident instructor in poultry husbandry was appointed at the Davis campus. His principal responsibility was in teaching non-degree courses; degree students from Berkeley were in residence at Davis only for the second semester of the senior year.

In 1925, William A. Lippincott, then head of the poultry division, was transferred to the Berkeley campus. In 1933, expansion of the work with turkeys was started at Davis by Dr. Vigfus S. Asmundson. Expansion of teaching and research programs continued at both campuses with Walther F. Holst (1931-32) and Lewis W. Taylor (1933-51) serving as chairmen. In 1951, the departmental office was transferred to Davis. George F. Stewart was appointed chairman, followed by Frederic W. Hill (1959-64) and Wilbor O. Wilson (after 1964). A new Poultry Building was built and occupied in 1953, the facilities for environmental research having been recently completed.

By the 1960s, of the many research fields in which the department gained recognition, perhaps the best known investigations were those related to the discovery of vitamin K, the relation of the B-vitamin to growth and reproduction, the identification of genetic and environmental factors controlling egg quality, the determination of amino acid requirements of poultry, and increase in knowledge of genetics basic to the development and application to poultry of principles of population genetics. There were also extensive studies on the biology and husbandry of turkeys, relations of environment to survival and reproduction, and the adverse effects of some natural components of feedstuffs. source

Poultry Husbandry was later renamed Avian Science, which eventually merged with Animal Science. See also Department of Animal Science.

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Psychiatry
There is no history currently available for this department. See School of Medicine.

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Psychology
While occasional courses in psychology had been offered at Davis earlier, William F. Dukes was the first full-time psychology professor, hired in 1953. The initial curriculum was patterned on the Berkeley model with three core lower-division courses--introductory, methodology, and human adjustment--and several upper-division courses in general experimental psychology. Unlike some other units, psychology began as an independent department housed in Haring Hall, with Mary Brinton providing secretarial assistance. After she retired in 1982, Diane (Noricks) Standley became the department MSO.

A single faculty member taught service courses in psychology until 1956, when Paul Dempsey was hired in personality-social psychology. Over the next few years, Dukes and Dempsey were joined by Andy Solarz (comparative) and Jay Caldwell (general-experimental). Staff members at Napa State Hospital were brought in to teach courses in abnormal and clinical psychology, and staff from the Counseling Center to teach the adjustment course; TAs were recruited from Berkeley and Sacramento State University. In 1959 the department moved into Voorhies Hall. Laboratories and a library were housed in Aggie Villa.

In 1963 the department added four faculty members: Stanley Coopersmith as chair, replacing Dukes, who became an associate dean; Jarvis Bastian; Marion Prentice; and Bob Sommer. Departmental offerings were greatly expanded. An M.A. program was established in 1964. Over the next decade the department grew steadily. Sommer served as chair from 1965-73, followed by Bill Mason (1974-75), Neal Kroll (1975-78), Alan Elms (1978-81), Al Harrison (1981-89), Don Owings (1989-94), Phil Shaver (1994-97), and Sally Mendoza (1998-present). The department moved into Young Hall in 1967, the Aggie Villa laboratories were closed, and additional space was acquired in Young Hall and, in 1996, in the new Humanities and Social Science building.

The doctoral program began in 1968. Students were admitted in three areas: social-personality, psychobiology, and perception-learning. The list later expanded to include developmental and quantitative psychology. The department currently has 25.2 ladder faculty FTE, 27 TAs, 11 staff, and about 100 undergraduate and 58 graduate students. Lecturers play a vital role in the teaching program and in career advising, especially in the clinical area.

Faculty have been active in obtaining extramural support and have received prestigious awards from virtually all the major professional societies. Outstanding awards include Bill Mason (APA Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions), Dean Simonton ( William James, Sir Francis Galton, and Mensa Awards), Charles Tart (Parapsychology Association); Alan Elms (Gordon Allport prize), Bob Sommer (Kurt Lewin Award), Leah Krubitzer (MacArthur Fellow), Greg Herek (Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest), and Stanley Sue (Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest and for Research in Public Policy). The department has long been known for excellence in undergraduate teaching, and teaching award winners include Bermant, Simonton, Acredolo, and Long. Faculty have been closely allied with various campus research centers and have played a leading role in other undergraduate majors, including Black Studies, Women's Studies, NPB, and Asian-American Studies, and in several graduate groups such as Animal Behavior, Ecology, and Neuroscience. source

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Public Health
Through control of animal diseases transmissible to man, by provision of adequate and wholesome food, and through participation in programs designed especially for the purpose, veterinary medicine has played an important role in the protection of human health.

Because of this role of veterinarians, an unofficial Department of Public Health was established at Davis under the direction of John B. Enright in 1950. Walter W. Sadler succeeded Dr. Enright in 1958, and also served as chairman following the official establishment of the department in 1960. Donald E. Jasper became acting chairman in 1961, and William R. Pritchard acted as chairman after 1962. There were three academic staff members in this department in 1965.

As of the late 1960s, the department instructed veterinary students in the epidemiology and control of the zoonoses and strictly human diseases, environmental sanitation, poultry and mammalian meat inspection, and milk inspection. It also offered graduate training. Through its research projects, the department contributed significantly to knowledge of the effect of pasteurization upon Coxiella burnetii and Nocardia asteroides in milk, the role of bats in transmission of rabies, the effect of disease syndromes upon the wholesomeness of poultry meats, and the role of poultry meats in the transmission of disease agents to humans. Research activities included studies of the sylvan ecology of Coxiella burnetii, factors affecting the prevention of Clostridium botulinum food intoxication, factors affecting the prevention of Salmonellae food infections, factors affecting the production of staphylococcal enterotoxin, the role of multiple infections upon the wholesomeness of poultry meats, and the prevention of transmission of Erysipelothrix insidiosa to humans through poultry meats. source

See also School of Veterinary Medicine.

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