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Los Angeles: Departments


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Pathology
Pediatrics
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Experimental Therapeutics
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Physics
Physics & Astronomy
Physiological Science
Physiology
Plant Pathology
Policy Studies
Political Science
Preventive Medicine and Public Health
Psychiatry
Psychology
Public Health
Public Policy

Pathology
The Department of Pathology may be presumed to have been established concurrently with the Los Angeles Center for Health Sciences in 1946, but its practical origins began with the initial planning of curriculum and facilities some months later. The first appointment of a full-time faculty member was that of the later professor and chairman on May 1, 1951. The the mid-1960s complement consisted of 16 full-time faculty, an additional four full-time in-residence faculty, and 18 part-time volunteer faculty. The number of interns, residents, and fellows grew from two in 1953 to a level ranging from 18 to 23 in the mid-1960s.

The curriculum permitted a method of instruction of sophomore medical students emphasizing a tutorial "graduate school" approach to the subject, topic by topic, through organized demonstrations and discussions at the same time that the student was presented illustrations of the entire span of disease through study of current autopsy cases. Instruction involving this immediate attention to patient material was possible through the block allotment of teaching time to pathology and medical microbiology-immunology and the cooperative arrangements between these two departments.

While no graduate degrees were given in pathology, extensive use of post-sophomore fellowships was made. Three to six members of the sophomore class were selected to spend the following full year in the study of pathology and in research in some field of experimental pathology, the fellows returning thereafter to the junior class. This five-year curriculum afforded such students an exceptional foundation for postdoctoral careers.

An additional significant feature of the undergraduate curriculum in pathology was the pathology-radiology clerkship required of junior students. One-eighth of the academic year was split between the study of current surgical pathology cases and current radiological cases. This tutorial approach demonstrated its merit both in the eyes of the clinical faculty who test students' knowledge of disease and the opinion of the students who completed their undergraduate work.

The extent of the research activities of the pathology faculty may be indicated by noting that in 1963, U.S. Public Health Service grants to the pathology department totaled $728,000, the largest amount granted to any pathology department in the United States. source

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Pediatrics
The Department of Pediatrics was born on July 1, 1950, with the appointment of Dr. John M. Adams as professor and chairman. The Korean War precipitated an accelerated development of the medical school and the first class was admitted in September, 1951. A course entitled Family Medicine, administered by pediatrics, was designed to provide the first year medical student with an opportunity to see patients and their families. Students were assigned a family in the well-baby clinics of the city of Los Angeles. They talked with mothers and visited homes with public health nurses. Emphasis was placed on the social aspects of medicine, accident prevention and the development of a doctor-patient relationship. The course was designed to give the student a longitudinal experience by allowing him to work closely with the original family throughout medical school. Dr. Arthur H. Parmelee, Jr., was the first director of the program.

In the students' second year, the pediatrics department participated actively in a new course entitled Introduction to Clinical Medicine. The course provided an opportunity to prepare the student for his major clinical responsibilities in the third and fourth years. In the third year, a nine-week clerkship in the outpatient clinic provided practical training in diagnosis and treatment of common problems in children. In the fourth year, students were assigned to the pediatric wards and were given responsibility for patient care.

On November 1, 1952, as a result of an agreement between the University and the Marion Davies Foundation, the operation of the Marion Davies Children's Clinic was assumed by the School of Medicine. Dr. Forrest H. Adams joined the full-time staff in July, 1952 and became the first medical director of the clinic. The original building, located in West Los Angeles, not only provided patients for care and teaching, but also permitted expansion of the staff and added valuable research laboratory space. The Marion Davies Children's Clinic, which housed the department, was added to the medical center and occupied in July, 1962.

Drs. J. Francis Dammann, Donald B. Lindsley, Stanley W. Wright David T. Imagawa, and James N. Yamazaki joined the staff in 1952. The following year, Drs. Nathan Smith and Robert A. Ulstrom were added to the full-time roster. Dr. Ulstrom returned to an advanced position at the University of Minnesota in 1956. However, on November 1, 1964, he returned to Los Angeles to become professor of pediatrics and chairman of the department. source

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Pharmacology, Toxicology and Experimental Therapeutics
Although the Department of Pharmacology was established in the summer of 1953 with the appointment of chairman Dr. Dermot B. Taylor, the Department of Physiology gave the course in pharmacology for medical students during 1952-53. The first duty of the new department was the establishment of an eight-unit medical student teaching program which would provide a basic groundwork in the action of drugs and sustain students through the large increment of therapeutic knowledge they would face in their future practice. To secure this objective, a set of teaching policies was developed and a program of research into the accuracy and validity of student examinations was started.

In 1954, a basic and specialized program for graduate students leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees was developed. This program included advanced courses devoted to the physiochemical basis of drug action, instruction in biostatistics, both theoretical and experimental, and basic neuropharrnacology. By 1965,graduate admissions had risen to 15, the maximum number that could be efficiently accommodated. In addition, there was been an increasing flow of overseas visitors, chiefly postdoctoral scholars from the British Isles who spent varying periods of time studying in the department. More than 30 such graduates had postdoctoral research studies exceeding one year each.

The research effort of the department always emphasized investigation at the most basic molecular level of problems concerned with the action of known drugs. The chief fields of endeavor are neuro-, cardiovascular, endocrine, and gastrointestinal pharmacology, although the first received the chief emphasis because of the department's close connection with the Brain Research Institute. The department also developed a useful joint research program with the Departments of Botany, Physiology, and Chemistry and the Veterans Administration hospitals.

One of the first and also one of the most important early appointments was that of Dr. Gordon A. Alles (Alles Laboratories, Pasadena) as professor of pharmacology in residence. Dr. Alles was best known for his discovery of the actions of benzedrine and for his introduction of this drug into medicine. His untimely death in 1962 was a great loss to the academic staff of the department. Dr. Alles was a benefactor in innumerable ways, including a donation to the departmental library, now named the Gordon A. Alles Memorial Library.

As of 1965, the department had eight full-time academic staff members and taught 74 medical students per year. source

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Philosophy
By the mid-1960s, the history of the Department of Philosophy extended over approximately 40 years. The department began to operate as a separate entity in the academic year 1924-25. Prior to this date, a limited number of courses in philosophy were offered under the joint auspices of a Department of Education, Psychology, and Sociology (1919-20), a Department of Education, Psychology, and Philosophy (1920-22), and a Department of Philosophy and Psychology (1922-24).

The operations of the department expanded greatly after the move to the Westwood campus in 1929. A comprehensive undergraduate curriculum was developed in the following years; in 1933, a graduate program was added. In 1934, the department awarded its first two M.A. degrees; in 1942, three candidates received the first Ph.D. degrees in philosophy. In this initial phase, the chief responsibility for planning, building, and running the department lay in the hands of Professors John E. Boodin, Hugh Miller, Donald A. Piatt, and Donald C. Williams. Dean Charles H. Rieber and Professor Ernest C. Moore (later vice-president and provost at Los Angeles) also participated in the early stages.

Several developments made a special contribution to the affairs of the department in the 1940s and 1950s. First, the brief encounter with Bertrand Russell. Though he stayed for one year only (1939-40), the impact of his presence lingered over the years. In 1938, Professor Hans Reichenbach came to the Los Angeles campus from the University of Istanbul. His arrival accelerated the rate of graduate studies in the department and marked the beginning of a curricular tradition, with special emphasis on studies in logic and the philosophy of science, that continued in the mid-1960s. After Reichenbach's untimely death in 1953, Professor Rudolf Carnap joined the department, lending his distinction to the advancement of this program.

In 1941, an endowment for a visiting professorship, established by Mr. and Mrs. C. N. Flint, became operative. Since 1943, the department useed the funds from this endowment to appoint 14 distinguished philosophers from this country and abroad as Flint Professors.

Over the years, the department regularly revised its own curriculum so as to provide expanding coverage in a variety of fields--logic, epistemology, semantics, metaphysics, ethics, the philosophy of law, and the history of philosophy. Since 1958, Professor Ernest A. Moody developed an entirely new program of studies in medieval philosophy. Upon his death in 1950, Boodin left his books and a sum of $25,000 to the University. The income from this fund was used for the purchase of books and journals for the department's reading room. Various members of the department added to this collection by leaving their books to the reading room upon their retirement: Miller (1958), Carnap (1962), and Piatt (1965). By the mid-1960s, the reading room contained approximately 2,500 books and over 700 volumes of philosophical journals.

In the fall of 1964, the total enrollment in philosophy consisted of 2,393 students of whom 94 were undergraduate and 90 were graduate majors. The curriculum grew in number of courses and in areas of specialization. The number of candidates for higher degrees increased steadily: 40 M.A. degrees were awarded between 1934 and 1965; 29 Ph.D. degrees between 1942 and 1965. Expanding operations brought a corresponding increase in staff: in 1924-25, there were three regular instructors; in 1964-65, the active teaching staff consisted of 16 members, and the department had an administrative staff of four full-time and three part-time employees. source

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Physical Education
The Department of Physical Education had its inception in the Los Angeles State Normal School in 1915. Four years later, it became a part of the Southern Branch of the University as two separate departments for men and for women in the Teachers College.

By 1924, the responsibilities of the two departments included the preparation of teachers of physical education, teaching and supervising in the required program for the general college students, intramural sports, general recreation for students, faculty, and employees, adapted physical education for handicapped students, and intercollegiate athletics later organized under ASUCLA.

With the construction of the two gymnasium and swimming pools in 1931, the total program of the department rapidly became established and was recognized as a vital and natural part of the University. Only six years later, graduate study for the M.S. degree was authorized. Also, the merger of the two departments, except for budgetary purposes, and the establishment of divisions for men and for women within a single department were approved.

In 1939, the department became a part of the new College of Applied Arts, inaugurating another period of rapid development. In cooperation with the School of Education, the Ed.D. degree with a specialization in physical education was added in 1947 and with a specialization in health education four years later.

In 1952, the divisions for men and women were eliminated, a unified budget was initiated, coordinators of men and women staff and facilities were appointed, and a philosophical commitment for a unified department was implemented through a unit plan of organization. By this time, undergraduate degree or concentration programs had expanded considerably with authorizations for dance, physical therapy, recreation, school health education, and rehabilitation. Graduate study was authorized in recreation, school health education, and rehabilitation.

The first research facility, the Human Performance Laboratory for studies of physiological and kinesiological factors in work, sports, and dance, was dedicated in 1958. Additional research facilities were: Performance Physiology Laboratory (1958); Perception and Motor Learning Laboratory (1965); and Underwater Research Laboratory (1965).

In 1960, the department was transferred from the College of Applied Arts to the Division of Life Sciences, College of Letters and Science. After more than a decade of experimentation, a revised physical education major centering in kinesiology, or the art and science of human movement, and involving primarily one of three allied fields of study--physiology, psychology, or sociology was approved in 1962. This major was destined to be a model for adoption by other universities, especially after the State Board of Education approved it in 1965 as being equivalent to that of an academic subject-matter major.

Before the merger of the separate departments in 1937, the chairmen were: for men--James Cline (prior to 1925) and William H. Spaulding (1925-36); and for women--Gertrude K. Colby (prior to 1926) and Ruth V. Atkinson (1926-36). Since 1937 the chairmanship was held successively by Frederick W. Cozens (1937-39), John F. Bovard (1939-47), Carl Haven Young (1947-52), Ben W. Miller (1952-62), and Donald T. Handy after 1962.

The leadership of the faculty of the department was acknowledged throughout the nation. Faculty members received an unusual proportion of elected offices and special honors and awards. They consistently pioneered on the frontiers of the profession in such problems and research areas as tests and measurements, unified and democratic administration, research and creative work in movement, counseling and guidance, and curriculum revision. source

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Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
The Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, School of Medicine, Los Angeles, was established in September, 1958 with the appointment of a professor who later became chairman. An eight-hour lecture course was given to the senior medical students which included the physiological basis for the use of physical agents in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, the interdisciplinary approach to medical rehabilitation, and the use of community service for meeting the needs of the disabled. Interdepartmental lectures were integrated with pediatrics, medicine, surgery, and psychiatry. An approved three-year residency program affiliated with the Wadsworth and Long Beach Veterans Administration Hospitals was established in 1959.

Trends in curriculum developmental programs included additional interdepartmental teaching in anatomy (functional anatomy), physiology, biophysics, and medical diagnosis. Proposals for electives in physical medicine and rehabilitation were made for a four and one-half week course to be given eight times a year and an 11-week course to be given two times a year. This would allow the students to study in more depth the problems of the long-term diseased and disabled patient.

A four-year pre-physical therapy curriculum was established in the College of Letters and Science and qualified the student to enter the certificate course in physical therapy which was planned for the new Rehabilitation Center on the campus.

In January, 1965, the responsibility for the physical medicine and rehabilitation program at Harbor Hospital was assumed by the department. It became an integral part of the teaching and research program.

Research activities included electromyography, nerve conduction velocity, the effects of spinal traction, movement of the sacroiliac joint, and measurement of physiological parameters in disease states, including muscular dystrophy, multiple sclerosis, and patients with cardiovascular disease. Detailed serum enzyme studies were made in neurological diseases. The faculty was also involved in the development and testing of new prostheses and mechanical assistive devices. The opening of the Rehabilitation Center's Human Performance and Environmental Laboratory allowed broader research on the disabled patient.

During the academic year, 1964-65, the faculty of the department taught 380 hours to medical students and 830 hours to graduate students. source

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Physics
The Department of Physics began in September, 1919, with one professor, John Mead Adams. He, with William Crowell in chemistry and George E. F. Sherwood in mathematics, had been charged with producing, almost overnight, a program in physical science. Adams collected three bricks from a construction project, bought three spring balances, and proceeded to teach physics to the rush of freshmen, G.I.'s from World War I, and some women headed for teaching positions. The next year, 1920, he had two student assistants, one of whom was Leo R. Delsasso, whose service to the department spanned the years 1920-63.

In 1922, Vern O. Knudsen joined the staff, serving as chairman of the department (1932 38) prior to becoming dean of the Graduate Division and eventually, chancellor. In 1923, the first upper division lecture courses were added; in 1924, the first upper division laboratories were added; and in 1925, the first bachelor's degrees were awarded, one of them to Delsasso. By this time, the staff numbered six, plus three assistants. Samuel J. Barnett joined the staff in 1926 and became the second chairman of the department (1926-31).

Although initiated on the Vermont campus, research in the fields of spectroscopy by Joseph W. Ellis, E. Lee Kinsey, and Joseph Kaplan, and in acoustics by Knudsen and his students, was for the first time adequately provided for in the new Physics-Biology Building on the Westwood campus.

By 1933, graduate work was authorized. In the fall of 1934, regular graduate courses leading to the master's degree were offered in the department for the first time. Permission was also granted to Norman Watson, a graduate student at Berkeley, to do research for a Ph.D. under Knudsen at Los Angeles. Watson received his Ph.D. degree for this work at Berkeley in 1937. Robert Leonard and Richard Bolt received their Ph.D.'s under the same plan in 1939 and 1940. By 1936, work leading to the Ph.D. degree was authorized at the Los Angeles campus and the first Ph.D. degree in physics was awarded in 1940.

During the chairmanship of Kaplan (1938-43), World War II made heavy demands on the department. Most staff members and graduate students were either called into the services or were assisting in programs of research and teaching connected with the war effort.

During the chairmanship of Ellis (1944-49), the department initiated a program of low energy nuclear physics. Under the supervision of J. Reginald Richardson, Kenneth R. MacKenzie, and Byron T. Wright, the first Lawrence cyclotron was transferred to Los Angeles from the Radiation Laboratory at Berkeley. Out of this program, the first sector-focused cyclotron to become operable was developed. A group in theoretical physics started with the addition to the staff of Alfredo Baños, David S. Saxon, and Robert J. Finkelstein. A program of high energy physics was started after the end of the war by Harold K. Ticho. Recently, under the chairmanship of Kinsey (1949-59), a program in solid state physics was established. Hans E. Bömmel, joined the staff in 1961.

To care for the needs of the rapidly expanding department, a second building was planned during the chairmanship of Kinsey, constructed during the chairmanship of Delsasso (1959-63), and occupied in the fall of 1963 at the beginning of the chairmanship of Saxon. This building was called Knudsen Hall and the original building was named Kinsey Hall--thus honoring two former chairmen of the department. source

Physics is now a part of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. See also Department of Astronomy.

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Physics and Astronomy
See Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy.

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Physiological Science
The Department of Physiology came into being as an integral part of the School of Medicine, which was established in 1946 by the state legislature. Prior to 1951, instruction in physiology had been given in the Department of Zoology. The instruction was oriented toward general and comparative rather than human physiology. This gap was filled by the Department of Physiology, both at the medical undergraduate and academic graduate levels.

Thus, the mission and activities of the department were twofold from the beginning. In its role of teaching medical students, its growth and development paralleled that of the School of Medicine. The size of the first year medical class rose from 28 in 1951 to 72 in 1965. The curricular structure remained essentially unchanged, but the course content and teaching methods continually evolved in response to the advance of knowledge, which was unusually rapid in this field.

The department was authorized to conduct M.S. and Ph.D. degree programs in 1952. The number of graduate students rose from two in 1953 to a level of 35 by the mid-1960s. The major strength of the department's research and graduate instruction was in neurophysiology and cardiovascular studies.

An important aspect of the department's activities was its relation to two associated projects. It was one of the groups making up the Brain Research Institute since the latter's establishment in 1959; four staff members had their laboratories in the institute. The Los Angeles County Heart Association in 1957 established a Cardiovascular Research Laboratory at the Los Angeles campus under the auspices of the Department of Medicine. However, the laboratory in its role of training investigators operated to a considerable extent through the Department of Physiology, since the laboratory's director and associate director held appointments in physiology. In addition, the department actively participated in the research activities of several Veterans Adminstration hospitals in this area. An addition to the department's activities was the Brain Information Service, which provided computer storage and retrieval of the world's literature in the basic neurological sciences for neurologists of this country and abroad.

The department's faculty members, in addition to their teaching and research, served as editors for most of the leading American journals of physiology. Particularly noteworthy was the initiation and editing here of the first section of the American Physiological Society's Handbook of Physiology.

In the mid-1960s, two of the department's faculty members served the University in administrative positions: one as associate dean of the School of Medicine, the other as University-wide dean of academic planning. source

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Physiology
There is no history currently available for this department.

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Plant Pathology
The assignment of Pierre A. Miller to UCLA on June 15,1933 initiated plant pathology on that campus as an extension of the Department of Plant Pathology at Riverside under the chairmanship of Howard S. Fawcett. This was done to add plant pathology to the study curriculum in subtropical horticulture and to conduct research on diseases of subtropical fruit plants. Miller inaugurated the introductory course in plant pathology during the fall semester 1933-34 and developed a second course on diseases of subtropical fruit plants in 1934. In 1939, when Kenneth F. Baker was appointed to the UCLA staff, a shift in research emphasis from diseases of ornamental plants was developed. Seminar and research courses completed the instructional offerings of this department. John G. Bald was added to this staff in 1948 to investigate diseases of bulbous ornamental plants, and Donald E. Munnecke joined that group in 1951 to develop a program dealing with disorders of nursery ornamentals and fungicidal control of them. Upon Professor Miller's retirement in 1958, Robert M. Endo joined the staff to establish a research program on turfgrass diseases.

The declining activity in agricultural instruction on the UCLA campus after 1958 precipitated the decision to reduce the plant pathology staff there by transferring Baker to the plant pathology department on the Berkeley campus and Munnecke and Endo to the Riverside campus on July 1, 1961.

Bald remained at UCLA to instruct the plant pathology course 120, which was last offered during the fall of 1964. The UCLA section of the department ceased to exist on July 1, 1964, at which time a Department of Agricultural Sciences was formed to accommodate College of Agriculture faculty remaining at UCLA.

During this relatively short period of departmental activity at UCLA, significant contributions to plant pathology were accomplished in both instruction and research. This group established a strong reputation in the field of research on diseases of ornamental plants and turf. The nursery industry benefited from concepts evolved by these research workers for the use of pathogen-free planting stock and utilization of a planting medium in which it is possible to control disease-producing organisms and plant nutrition. Although not possessing an undergraduate or graduate major program, five persons who participated in the introductory course as undergraduates completed their education in plant pathology on other campuses of the University, and through an arrangement with the Berkeley Department of Plant Pathology, three M.S. degrees and six Ph.D. degrees were granted to students who conducted their dissertation research at UCLA with members of that staff. source

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Policy Studies
There is no history currently available for this department.

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Political Science
Courses in government were first offered in 1920-21 by Dr. Charles E. Martin. Within two years the staff had grown to six and the offering included well-rounded programs in international relations, politics, comparative government, public administration and municipal government. Little reorganization was needed when upper division work was formally authorized in February, 1923, except to expand the offering in political theory. Public law became a strong field in 1925-26 when Charles Grove Haines joined the staff, which totaled ten members by the mid-1960s.

Of this early staff, the founding member (Martin) was to become president of the American Society of International Law; William H. George became dean of arts and sciences at the University of Hawaii; Marshall F. McComb, a judge since 1927, now serves on the California Supreme Court; Clarence A. Dykstra became city manager of Cincinnati, president of the University of Wisconsin, and then returned to the Lo Angeles campus as its third chancellor. Both he and Haines became presidents of the American Political Science Association.

By 1925-26, class enrollments exceeded 1,500 per semester, but about 600 were in-service courses that were largely discontinued. Undergraduate enrollment grew steadily and exceeded 3,000. By the 1960s, the number of baccalaureates granted generally exceeded those of any other department save engineering, or any curriculum save general elementary education.

One of the first departments or fields authorized to give graduate instruction, the department awarded its first master's degrees in 1934, and its first doctorates in 1939. By the mid-1960s, doctorates granted totaled 76 and the department had 53 students who were formally admitted to candidacy for the doctorate plus 79 post-M.A.students preparing for their Ph.D. qualifying examinations.

Although the basic program remained relatively stable, greater emphasis was given to area studies. The department furnished a disproportionate share of directors of the various area centers, and its members consistently headed the Committee on Political Change and the International Securities program. Increasing emphasis was given to behavioral studies, with an excellent laboratory and ready access to the University Computing Facility and Western Data Processing Center. The departmental library had well over 4,000 reference volumes and a basic selection of current journals in the field, all received as gifts or on indefinite loans.

By the mid-1960s, the teaching staff, including visitors, numbered 47, of whom 38 were in residence. Throughout its history, members of the department were active in civic, governmental, and professional affairs at the local, state, and national levels. Furthermore, studies of the profession rated the department as one of the "elite 11" whose graduate degrees carry the greatest prestige. source

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Preventive Medicine and Public Health
The Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health at the Los Angeles campus was established in 1953. Budgetary provision was made initially for two professors and two non-academic positions. A Committee on Instruction in Public Health, appointed by the chief campus administrative officer in 1950, recommended that a modern medical center should include a School of Public Health working closely with the departments in the School of Medicine (especially the Department of Preventive Medicine) through joint appointments, research, and teaching. In support of the 1953-54 budget for preventive medicine and public health, the dean of the School of Medicine stated that the purpose was to provide staff and facilities to furnish the curriculum required to serve the campus generally and the Schools of Medicine and Public Health specifically. Program in biostatistics, epidemiology, health administration, occupational health, and social welfare in medicine were soon developed. They were staffed by tenure professors with joint appointments in the School of Public Health. The faculty of the department gives instruction to all medical students in these subjects. Graduate programs were conducted in conjunction with the School of Public Health. Considerable support was provided by the department's staff to the family medicine program of the Department of Pediatrics.

Noteworthy achievements were made in the use of electronic data processing and in training in biostatistics. The Division of Biostatistics, under the leadership of Professor Wilfrid J. Dixon, established a $3.3 million Health Science Computing Facility in 1963--the largest of its kind. This was preceded for several years by a rapidly growing staff and training program. The Division of Biostatistics and the computing facility developed statistical and mathematical methods of aid to medical research, provided a computing system in support of medical research, and developed new programs and techniques to make use of the computer more effective.

These programs attracted postdoctoral fellows, research investigators, and students from various parts of the world. The activities were strongly supported by the National Institutes of Health.

The Division of Social Welfare in Medicine, established in the department in 1956 with a staff of social workers, provided service to patients in the hospitals and clinics as an integral part of the professional activities of the medical center. The staff participated in teaching and research guided by an interdepartmental committee representing the clinical departments and Schools of Nursing, Public Health, and Social Welfare; Student Health Services; and hospital administration. source

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Psychiatry
During the first two years of operation of the medical school and prior to the formal establishment of a full-time department, the groundwork was laid for the teaching of psychiatry emphasizing a psychodynamic orientation. Instruction content was drawn from the basic science fields and included a review of personality development, psychiatric disorders, and their pathology. The Department of Psychiatry was officially organized on May 1, 1953, with Dr. Norman Q. Brill, appointed chairman of the department and medical director of the Neuropsychiatric Institute. The construction of the institute in 1960 completed the plan for a psychiatric facility which was closely integrated with the rest of the School of Medicine.

The original plan of presenting psychiatry in each of the four years of medical school was carried out and refined. The first year introductory course entitled The Basic Science of Human Behavior described normal personality development and function and the interactions between the individual and the environment, using both biological and psychodynamic data. The department also participated in the Correlation Clinics of the first year and in the interdepartmental course, Family Medicine.

In the second year, the student was given a detailed study of the classification of the mental disorders and their underlying psychopathology. Concurrently, 12 additional hours of instruction in psychiatric history-taking and mental examination were presented as part of another interdepartmental course, Introduction to Clinical Medicine.

Throughout the third year, each student spent one-half day a week in the Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic, where emphasis was placed on the use of brief psychotherapeutic methods in treating the less severe emotional disturbances commonly encountered in medical practice.

A clinical clerkship involving the study of hospitalized patients in Los Angeles County General Hospital, Camarillo, Brentwood Neuropsychiatric Hospital, and the Neuropsychiatric Institute was conducted during the fourth year. In addition, weekly clinics, centering about case presentations and lectures were given to demonstrate the importance of emotional problems in the common types of medical and surgical disorders.

On a graduate level, the department offered an approved three-, four-, and five-year residency training program in general psychiatry. Postgraduate fourth- and fifth-year training program were offered in child psychiatry and in social and community psychiatry.

During 1964-65, the department had 70 residents and fellows in training; about 25 per cent of the graduates obtained full-time academic teaching positions. source

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Psychology
Even before 1900, the Los Angeles State Normal School was sufficiently progressive to have developed a Department of Psychology. By 1900, there was a laboratory with adequate equipment and courses in general, child, educational, and clinical psychology. In addition, there were courses in experimental methods and experimental psychology. Thus, psychology at Los Angeles had its antecedence less than 20 years after the formal founding of the discipline in 1879.

When the normal school moved to North Vermont Avenue in 1914, the Department of Psychology was housed in one of the central buildings. Following the absorption of the normal school into the University in 1919, the growth of the institution was rapid and the department shared in this development. The academic duties of the staff were supplemented by services to the Whittier State School, the juvenile court, and the Los Angeles police department. In 1921, the Psychology Clinic School was established by the Regents.

With the development of a four-year College of Letters and Science, it was decided to strengthen the Department of Psychology, especially in the experimental area. Shepherd Ivory Franz, a distinguished physiological psychologist, was brought to Los Angeles as professor of psychology and chairman of the department in 1924.

When the campus was moved to Westwood, psychology was housed in the library building and shared vivarium space on the roof of the old Physics Building with the Department of Biology. By this time, psychology was offering a very well-rounded curriculum and producing a succession of highly successful bachelors of arts who later proceeded to doctoral degrees at other institutions. When, in September, 1933, graduate study was initiated at Los Angeles, one of the original 13 departments authorized to accept graduate students was psychology.

Almost simultaneously with the initiation of graduate work, the untimely death of Franz occurred. In 1935, Knight Dunlap came to the Los Angeles campus from Johns Hopkins with the understanding that he was to participate in the planning of a new psychology laboratory more worthy of a developing major department. In 1937, the department was approved to accept candidates for the doctor of philosophy degree. In 1940, what was to be the first wing of a building to house all of the life sciences was occupied largely by psychology, but partly by sociology and anthropology.

The greatest development in complexity of activity took place at the graduate level. In addition to strong programs in experimental and physiological psychology, the department was approved by the American Psychological Association to offer training in the areas of clinical and counseling psychology. By the mid-1960s, the department enrolled over 190 graduate students and, with chemistry, was the largest producer of doctor of philosophy degrees on the Los Angeles campus. In addition, the department had over 700 undergraduate major students. source

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Public Health
There is no history currently available for this department.

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Public Policy
There is no history currently available for this department.

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