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University of California: Universitywide and Affiliated Institutions


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Tobacco-Related Disease Research Program (TRDRP)
Toxic Substances Research and Teaching Program (TSR&TP)
Transportation and Traffic Engineering, Institute of

Tobacco-Related Disease Research Program (TRDRP)
Proposition 99, ratified by California voters in 1988, instituted a 25-cent-per-pack tax on cigarettes. Five percent of this revenue would go to research on tobacco-related disease. In October 1989, the legislature requested that the University of California establish a grant program for the elimination of tobacco-related disease, and subsequently asked them to create a program that would eliminate smoking in California altogether. source

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Toxic Substances Research and Teaching Program (TSR&TP)
The Toxic Substances Research and Teaching Program (TSR&TP) formed in 1985 as a result of an initiative passed by the California State Legislature. The Program supports research and graduate education on toxics-related fields by awarding around $2 million a year in grants, fellowships, and program funds. It also serves as a hub for communication between the government, industry, research community, and general public through its forums, symposia, newsletters, annual reports, and research directory.

Occasionally, the TSR&TP will run specialized initiatives, like the MTBE research program. In 1998, the program published a report detailing the effects of MTBE (methyl tertiary-butyl ether) on the environment, which contributed to Governor Gray Davis's Executive Order to phase out the use of MTBE in gasoline. The TSR&TP continues to have significant influence in the awareness of toxic-substances and the state of environmental protection. source

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Transportation and Traffic Engineering, Institute of
The Institute of Transportation and Traffic Engineering (B) (LA) is an organized research unit (ORU) and was established following a 1947 act of the California State Legislature. The act provided for an organization to be formed at the University of California to carry on research and education related to the design, operation, maintenance, and safety of highways, airports, and other facilities for public transportation. By the 1960s, the institute had facilities at the Richmond Field Station and on the Berkeley and Los Angeles campuses with headquarters at Berkeley. It had a statewide director, assistant directors at UCLA and Berkeley, and staffs of academic and professional personnel on both campuses.

In the 1960s, research facilities included laboratory and mobile equipment for roadway and traffic studies; at the Richmond Field Station, soil mechanics, asphalt, and vehicle-equipment laboratories, and an 800-foot "fog chamber" for studying aircraft landing conditions; at Los Angeles, a highly developed driving simulator and instrumentation for collision injury research with actual vehicles and human dummies. Research included projects in traffic flow theory, systems design and operations, materials and structures, safety of vehicles and equipment, and driver behavior. Other studies aimed at interdisciplinary approaches to transportation management, financing, and planning.

By the mid-1960s, the institute supported graduate programs offered in the Division of Transportation Engineering. Continuing education for professionals in the transportation fields was provided in cooperation with University Extension. The institute engaged in public service advisory work and published a quarterly bulletin and various papers and reports.--RHC

ITS eventually based its work on three campuses: Berkeley, Davis, and Irvine. ITS at Berkeley researched topics such as the following: aviation and airport design and operation, intelligent transportation, traffic theory, public policy, logistics, systems analysis, and environmental policy. Starting in Davis in 1991, ITS-Davis organized research in topics such as fuel cell vehicles, new mobility research, and advanced environmental vehicle technologies. ITS at Irvine specialized in topics such as artificial intelligence/expert systems in transportation, alternative fuels, and travel demand forecasting. source

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