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Berkeley: Departments and Programs


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Immunology, Division of
Industrial Engineering and Operations Research
Infectious Diseases and Immunity Program
Information Management and Systems
Integrative Biology
Inderdisciplinary Studies Program
International and Area Studies, Division of
Italian

Immunology, Division of
See Molecular and Cell Biology.

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Industrial Engineering and Operations Research
The Department of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research developed from one of the oldest disciplines established at Berkeley. The College of Mechanics began as required by law when the University opened in 1869. In 1931, the Colleges of Mechanics and Civil Engineering combined into the College of Engineering and the Department of Mechanical Engineering was established.

By 1954, a Division of Industrial Engineering was established in the mechanical engineering department. Its unchanged basic objectives were to educate students in the fields of production engineering, the economics of engineering methods, and related policy and administration matters.

Professor E. Paul DeGarmo became division chairman in 1954. As the program grew, a separate Department of Industrial Engineering was founded in 1956, with DeGarmo remaining as chairman until 1960. Professor Ronald W. Shephard headed the department from 1960 to July, 1964. Professor Robert M. Oliver was appointed chairman on July, 1964. On July 1, 1966, the name of the department was changed to the Department of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research.

Formerly, the emphasis in industrial engineering at Berkeley centered on the economic analysis of time and motion studies of men in their production activities, the role of materials and methods used in manufacturing processes, and in the design and use of tools and fixtures which played an extremely important part in the development of automated assembly lines and mass production techniques. The emphasis in 1965, however, was on the design and control of highly integrated systems, with large numbers of interrelated components, in which logistic problems, transport, project development, congestion, reliability, information, and data processing play a large role. In these areas, the economics of action was an essential element. Most courses dealing with the analysis and design of metal processing, forming, and shaping techniques were returned to the mechanical engineering department, while there was an expanded number of courses offering mathematical programming, network flow and combinatorial techniques, queueing, inventory, and reliability theory, work systems measurement, and human factors design.

A broad undergraduate curriculum was maintained and a graduate program developed which offered options in administrative engineering, human factors in technology, and operations research. The academic program in operations research was supported by research activities in the Operations Research Center; the human factors program also had new laboratory facilities. These facilities along with the department office were located in Etcheverry Hall.

From a division in 1956 with an undergraduate enrollment of 74 and a graduate enrollment of three, the Department of Industrial Engineering grew to a department with 53 undergraduate students and 97 graduate students in 1964-65. In that year, 18 B.S., 26 M.S., and 11 Ph.D. degrees were awarded. source

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Infectious Diseases and Immunity Program
There is no history currently available for this program.

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Information Management and Systems
See Colleges and Schools, School of Information Management and Systems.

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Integrative Biology
There is no history currently available for this department. See Botany, Genetics, Physiology-Anatomy, Paleontology, and Zoology.

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Interdisciplinary Studies Program
There is no history currently available for this program.

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International and Area Studies, Division of
There is no history currently available for this division.

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Italian
The study of Italian began on the Berkeley campus in 1891 with an elective elementary course offered within the Department of Romance Languages. One or two such courses were taught each year by professors of French or Spanish until 1900, when the subject was first included in the departmental announcement. Two upper division courses were added in 1905-06 and the first graduate course--in French, Spanish, and Italian--was added in 1908. From this time until 1919, the department had only one teacher of Italian.

The independent existence of the Department of Italian, which began in 1919, was followed immediately by a greatly increased student enrollment and a corresponding multiplication of course offerings. Instead of some 30 students ordinarily taking Italian as in the past, about 180 enrolled for the fall term of that year. Off-campus interest, also, soon became important. Upon invitation from the department and the Circolo Italiano (a students' organization), prominent San Francisco Italians began to participate in cultural events at the University, such as, in 1921, a "dignified commemoration" of the 600th anniversary of the death of Dante Alighieri. This spirit of cooperation, according to the President's Report (1921-1922), "augured the beginning of a closer association" that would make the University "an important center for the cultivation of Italian history, art, and literature."

The President's prediction was soon borne out by events. In later reports he recorded the presentation by Italians of a bust of Dante for the library; the appointment in 1923 of a distinguished scholar, Herbert H. Vaughan, as professor of Italian; and the gift of the Fontana Library, dedicated on May 29, 1924, by the Italian Ambassador.

Meanwhile, another cherished dream, the establishment of a chair of Italian culture at the University, was also coming true, although the campaign for raising the necessary funds took about eight years. Of the more than 500 contributions received, the first, and one of the largest, was $5,000 from Amadeo P. Giannini, president of the Bank of Italy; the smallest was $.50. Contributors included many interested individuals, some of whom were born in Italy, and organizations as diverse as the San Francisco Opera Association and the Scavengers' Protective Union. With 875 shares of Bank of Italy stock worth $260,000, the formal inauguration of the chair took place on October 6, 1928, the President of the University presiding. This endowment made possible the presence on campus, by the mid-1960s, of 15 visiting Italian scholars of distinction representing many different fields.

The Department of Italian grew from a single teacher in 1919 to include, in 1964-65, three professors, one associate professor, three assistant professors, three lecturers, four associates, two visiting professors, and 26 teaching assistants working for higher degrees. The number of students increased to 1,409 for the fall term of 1964-65. A departmental library of approximately 1,000 choice volumes supplemented the general University collection. source

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