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Los Angeles: Administrative Officers

Chief Campus Officers
Originally, the Los Angeles campus was under the supervision of a director whose title was changed to vice-president and director in 1930 and vice-president and provost in 1931. From 1945-48, the chief executive at Los Angeles was called provost of the University and in 1948, vice-president and provost of the University. In 1952, chancellor became the official title. During two interim periods (1942 to 1945 and 1950 to 1952) when the campus was without a provost, administrative affairs were handled by a three-man committee. source

Ernest Carroll Moore, 1919-36
Ernest Carroll Moore played a major role in the founding and early development of the Los Angeles campus. Born in Youngstown, Ohio, on July 20, 1871, he was educated at Ohio Normal University, Columbia University, and the University of Chicago, where he received the Ph.D. degree in 1898. In the same year, he joined the University faculty at Berkeley to teach philosophy and education. Between 1906 and 1910, Moore served as superintendent of schools in Los Angeles, then taught at Yale for four years and at Harvard for three years. In 1917, he became president of the Los Angeles State Normal School, which, in 1919, became the Southern Branch of the University of California. From 1919 to 1936, he served first as director and finally as vice-president and provost. After his retirement from administrative duties in 1936, Moore served as professor of philosophy and education until 1941. He died in 1955. source

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Earle Raymond Hedrick, 1937-45
Earle Raymond Hedrick served as the second chief campus officer. He was born September 27, 1876, in Union City, Indiana, and was educated at the University of Michigan, Harvard, and the University of Goettingen, Germany. He taught at Sheffield Scientific School (Yale) from 1901 to 1903 and at the University of Missouri from 1903 to 1924. He joined the faculty of the Southern Branch of the University in 1924 as professor of mathematics and as chairman of the department. In 1937, Hedrick was named vice-president of the University and provost of the Los Angeles campus, a position he held until 1942. He died in 1943. source

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Clarence Addison Dykstra, 1945-52
Clarence Addison Dykstra was provost during the post-World War II period. Born in Cleveland, Ohio, February 26, 1883, he graduated from the State University of Iowa and was a fellow and teaching assistant at the University of Chicago until 1908. He taught at the University of Kansas from 1909 to 1918, served for two years as executive secretary of the Cleveland Civic League, then two years as secretary of the Chicago City Club. He came to the Southern Branch of the University in 1923 and taught municipal administration until 1930. From 1930 to 1937, he was city manager of Cincinnati, and in 1938, he became president of the University of Wisconsin, a post he held until 1945. He took one year's leave of absence, 1940-41, to serve as the first director of selective service. In 1945, he was named provost of the Los Angeles campus and served until his death in 1950. source

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Raymond Bernard Allen, 1952-59
Raymond Bernard Allen was chief executive during a period of rapid campus expansion and was the first to hold the title of chancellor. Born in Cathay, North Dakota, August 7, 1902, he was graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1924 and earned his M.D. degree from the same institution in 1928. For two years thereafter, he was a general practitioner in North Dakota. In 1933, Dr. Allen won a Mayo Fellowship and in 1934, received the Ph.D. degree from the Mayo Foundation Division of the University of Minnesota's Graduate Division. He went into medical administration, serving at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, Wayne University's College of Medicine, the Chicago Colleges of the University of Illinois, and Illinois' College of Medicine. In 1946, he became president of the University of Washington. Dr. Allen became chancellor of the Los Angeles campus in 1952. During his tenure, the Center for the Health Sciences came into being. He served until 1959, at which point he resigned and became the Director of the International Cooperation Administration in Indonesia. Later, Allen joined the World Health Organization in Washington D.C. source

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Vern Oliver Knudsen, 1959-60
Vern Oliver Knudsen served as chancellor for one year and played a leading role in establishing graduate studies and research at the Los Angeles campus. Born in Provo, Utah, December 27, 1893, he earned his A.B. degree at Brigham Young University and the Ph.D. in physics and mathematics at the University of Chicago in 1922. In that same year he joined the faculty of the Southern Branch of the University as an instructor in physics. From 1924 to 1958, Knudsen served briefly as dean of graduate studies and subsequently as dean of the graduate division. In 1958, he became vice-chancellor and in 1959, chancellor; he retired in 1960. Knudsen served as a consultant in architectural acoustics to the Hollywood motion picture studios, the Hollywood Bowl, the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, and the Los Angeles Music Center, and was president of the American Acoustical Society, 1933-35. source

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Franklin David Murphy, 1960-68
Franklin David Murphy assumed the position of chancellor at UCLA on July 1, 1960. Born in Kansas City, Missouri, January 29, 1916, he was graduated from the University of Kansas in 1936, spent 1936-37 on an exchange fellowship at the University of Goettingen, Germany, and was graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1941 with an M.D. degree. Dr. Murphy served with the U.S. Army in World War II, working on research projects in tropical diseases. He was separated with the rank of captain in 1946. From 1948 to 1951, he was dean of the School of Medicine and associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Kansas. In 1951, he was named chancellor of the University of Kansas, serving in that capacity until he went to Los Angeles in 1959. He played important roles in the realization of Pauley Pavilion, the establishment of the Jules Stein Eye Institute, and the passage of the 1962, 1964, and 1966 bond issues that provided UCLA with $95 million in construction funds. He left the campus in 1968 to become Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of the Times Mirror Company. source

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Charles E. Young, 1968-97
Charles E. Young took office as chancellor of UCLA on September 1, 1968, and was formally inaugurated on May 23, 1969. Born on Dec. 30, 1931, in San Bernardino, California, Dr. Young's association with the University of California began in 1953, when he enrolled as a transfer student at UC Riverside. There, he served as the new campus's first student body president. After graduating with honors in 1955, he pursued doctoral studies in political science at UCLA, earning his M.A. in 1957 and Ph.D. in 1960. In 1959, as a member of UC President Clark Kerr's staff, he participated in the creation of the Master Plan for Higher Education in California and the University Growth Plan.

Dr. Young returned to UCLA in 1960 to serve in a series of executive posts in the administration of Chancellor Franklin D. Murphy: assistant to the chancellor (1960-62), assistant chancellor (1962-63), and vice chancellor for administration (1963-68). He also became a full professor in the political science department. Following Chancellor Murphy's resignation, Dr. Young was named his successor by the UC Regents on July 12, 1968. When he became chancellor at the age of 36, Dr. Young was the youngest person at the helm of any major American university. He retired June 30, 1997, after serving 29 years at the helm of UCLA. source

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Albert Carnesale, 1997-
Albert Carnesale became chancellor of UCLA on July 1, 1997, and was formally inaugurated on May 15, 1998, as UCLA's eighth chief executive. Born on July 2, 1936, Chancellor Carnesale grew up in a tenement in the Bronx, New York. He earned B.M.E. and M.S. degrees in mechanical engineering at Cooper Union in 1957 and Drexel University in 1961, respectively. In 1966, he received a Ph.D. in nuclear engineering at North Carolina State University.

Before he assumed leadership of UCLA, Chancellor Carnesale served for 23 years in numerous capacities at Harvard University. He joined the Cambridge campus in 1974 as the Lucius N. Littauer Professor of Public Policy and Administration at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government. Earlier in his career, Dr. Carnesale was a member of the faculty at North Carolina State University from 1962 to 1969, and again from 1972 to 1974. In the intervening years, he held a position in government as part of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency from 1969 to 1972. In addition, he worked in private industry for Martin Marietta Corporation from 1957 to 1962.

He currently holds faculty appointments in the UCLA Department of Policy of Studies at the School of Public Policy and Social Research and in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the School of Engineering and Applied Science. source

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