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Santa Barbara: Departments


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Marine Science
Materials
Mathematics
Mechanical Engineering
Media Arts and Technology
Medieval Studies
Military Science
Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology
Music

Marine Science
There is no history currently available for this department.

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Materials
There is no history currently available for this department.

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Mathematics
In 1944, when Santa Barbara State College became Santa Barbara College of the University of California, instruction in mathematics was given through the Department of Natural Science, headed by Hazel W. Severy. A separate Department of Mathematics was established in 1947 with Stanley E. Rauch as chairman. He served until 1954, when the college moved to the Goleta campus. Subsequent chairmen were Lewis F. Walton (1954-55), Rauch (1955-58), Paul J. Kelly (1958-62), David Merriell (acting, 1962-63), and Marvin Marcus (after 1963).

Between 1944 and the mid-1960's, the staff of the department increased from five instructors of undergraduate mathematics, each teaching other subjects, to a full-time faculty of 25 in 1965-66.

Only a minor in mathematics was offered in 1944. The major in mathematics was authorized in 1946-47. Award of the M.A. degree was approved in 1959, and in 1961 the M.A. program in applied mathematics was initiated. Finally in 1962, granting of the Ph.D. degree was authorized. The first doctorates were awarded to three candidates in the spring of 1965. In the fall of 1964, there were 327 undergraduates majoring in mathematics and 39 graduate students seeking a higher degree (19 aspirants for the M.A. degree and 20 for the Ph.D. degree). From 1944 to 1964, the mathematics curriculum increased from 18 to 58 undergraduate courses, of which 26 were graduate offerings. Many of these offerings reflected the department's research emphases, which included modern algebra, functional analysis, real variables, graph theory, and topology.

During the summer sessions of 1961-65, the department received National Science Foundation (NSF) funds in support of an Institute for Teachers of Secondary Mathematics. The NSF also supported Summer Conferences in Linear Algebra, which were given by the department in the summers of 1964 and 1965. source

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Mechanical Engineering
The Department of Mechanical Engineering was established in 1964 and began operation as a separate unit of the School of Engineering in July, 1964. Otto W. Witzell was appointed chairman. The staff for the first year of operation also included Karl Ihrig, Richard Matula, Kenneth Bockman, and George Wilson. The previously existing applied mechanics group became a part of the mechanical engineering department.

The new department began its operations in the Arts Building. Courses were developed and offered for freshmen and juniors which would fit the requirements of a newly devised curriculum. Work was begun on the development of laboratories and course offerings for the remaining two years. Junior enrollment for 1965 was 13 students. Preliminary planning of a new structure to eventually house the activities of mechanical engineering was started in the mid-1960's. It was expected that occupancy of such a building would take place in 1971. source

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Media Arts and Technology
There is no history currently available for this department.

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Medieval Studies
There is no history currently available for this department.

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Military Science
The Department of Military Science and Tactics was established in 1947 with Colonel Richard G. McKee as professor. The first two years of military science were compulsory until 1962. From 1947 to 1962, enrollment in the compulsory program increased from 126 to 796. The voluntary upper-division portion of the military science program increased from ten to 81 during the same period, with the highest enrollment being attained during the Korean War period.

The complete four-year program, under the leadership of Lt. Col. George M. Boone, Jr., was initiated on a voluntary basis in 1962, and total enrollment decreased from 877 in September, 1961, to 328 in September, 1964. However, upper division enrollment increased from 81 to 91, and the number of cadets receiving commissions in the Regular Army or Army Reserve increased from 33 to 45 during the same period.

Under the ROTC Vitalization Act of 1964, cadet pay was increased from $.90 per day to $40 per month during the nine-month school period, and from $78 to $120 per month during the six-week summer training camp period. Under this same act a new two-year ROTC program was offered whereby students transferring from junior colleges, or other students who were unable to participate in the first two years of the basic course, might apply to attend a basic summer training camp for six weeks. Upon successful completion of this basic camp they could apply for enrollment in the advanced ROTC program. At the game time a four-year scholarship program for high school graduates and a two-year scholarship program for ROTC students who successfully completed the first two-year basic course program were established. Two members of this ROTC brigade were offered two-year scholarships beginning in September, 1965.

Under the four-year program, eight courses in military science and a six-week summer training period were taught by the department's faculty members under the chairmanship of Col. George C. Dewey. source

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Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology
There is no history currently available for this department.

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Music
Before Santa Barbara State College became a University campus in 1944, its music department was offering a major in the Divisions of Applied Arts and Letters and Science (1940), instituted by Helen M. Barnett, director of the department for ten years. Van Christy, department head from 1942 to 1949, expanded the departmental offerings, particularly in the performance medium.

In 1949, Maurice Faulkner assumed the chairmanship of the department, expanding the instrumental program and adding a course in Techniques of Radio Broadcasting. During John Gillespie's chairmanship the college moved to the Goleta campus (1954) and into the new Music Building in 1958. New courses were added, particularly at the graduate level. In 1958, the music department became a part of the College of Letters and Science.

Clayton Wilson, acting chairman in 1958, became chairman in 1960. He was instrumental in working out the M.A. degree program in music, which became active in the fall of 1960. At this time, the Paganini Quartet came to the campus, remaining "in residence" through the spring of 1965. Karl Geiringer, musicologist and author, joined the faculty in 1961 to teach in the graduate program, particularly in the research seminars.

In the fall of 1962, Roger Chapman became chairman of the department and with Karl Geiringer developed the Ph.D. degree program in music, which was initiated In the fall of 1964. During Roger Chapman's sabbatical leave in 1964-65, Carl Zytowski became acting chairman. He initiated a critical study of the departmental course offerings and the methods of teaching them. This was in anticipation of the new goals implied by the institution of the program for the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in music. Peter Fricker, distinguished British composer, joined the faculty in 1964-65 as a visiting professor. He was appointed a permanent faculty member beginning in the fall of 1965.

In 1965, there were 77 undergraduate and 13 graduate students enrolled. More than 60 courses were then taught by the department's faculty of 22 members. Evidence of the department's emphasis on performance was given by its 12 very active performing ensembles in the instrumental, choral, and operatic areas of music. source

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